Coryza Question

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by mekawe71, Apr 22, 2012.

  1. mekawe71

    mekawe71 New Egg

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    Apr 19, 2012
    I recently brought home a rooster from a friend of mine. He and my other rooster had a disagreement, so I penned him up. Two weeks later I realize he is sick. Snotty nose, nasty smell, loss of weight, loud raspy respiration. I started treating with Sulmet and the loud respiration went away. I thought he was getting better, but then one side of his face swelled up so much he couldn't open his eye. I decided the best option was to cull both him and the other rooster.
    Now I have two Turken pullets in my flock that got sick. One had a snotty nose as her only symptom, I am treating her with Sulmet and she is better. The other one has no snotty nose, but does have the loud raspy respiration this morning. I am treating her now as well. They both also have a bit of blood in their poop?
    I am pretty sure from the roosters symptoms I am dealing with Coryza. My question is, can I assume all my chickens are exposed since they sleep in the same coop together? I have chicks that are 6 weeks, 10 weeks and 4 months old. The Turkens are in the 4 month old group. If I separate the young ones do I have a chance they may not have contacted it? From what I have read about it, young ones don't get it? Or should I assume they will all carry it from now on? I really don't want to cull all my chicks.
     
  2. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Nov 27, 2008
    Jacksonville, Florida
    I agree with your coryza assessment. The Turkens may be shedding intestinal lining which may have a little blood in the feces. You'll want to keep them seperated from the chicks, or cull because they are showing coryza symptoms. Sulmet is harsh on their system, that could possibly be a cause of blood in poop as well. Seperate the 6 week and 10 week old chicks from the 4 month old birds (Turkens.) You're going to have to wait and see if the 6 and 10 week old birds become infected.
    It sounds like you've done some research on coryza and are properly treating them with sulmet. Unfortunately with coryza, the outcome isnt good as you know and birds remain carriers and it's contageous.
    Here's a link to Incubaton Periods for Diseases, scroll down to Infectious Coryza:
    http://amerpoultryassn.com/respiratory_disease.htm
    I recommend quaranting new birds for at least 4-6 weeks before introducing them to your flock. This will give time for most diseases to show themselves. It also gives you time to thoroughly inspect the bird(s) for external parasites and treat for internal parasites as well as any other abnormalties.
     
  3. mekawe71

    mekawe71 New Egg

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    Apr 19, 2012
    So, if I separate the young ones and they don't get sick, can I assume they do not carry it? If I cull the sick birds and the rest (adults) don't get sick, can I assume they don't carry it?
     
  4. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Nov 27, 2008
    Jacksonville, Florida
    Again, keeping in mind the incubation period of the disease, you're going to have wait and observe them for symptoms. Then it'll be your decision whether to cull or not if symptoms do appear.
     
  5. mekawe71

    mekawe71 New Egg

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    Apr 19, 2012
    So if I keep them segregated for three months and no one gets sick, can I assume they are not carrying Coryza? I currently have 3 sick chickens in one pen, well away from the rest. I have put the young ones in another pen. The rest are in the original coop, which I have disinfected to the best of my ability.

    Strange that one of the sick ones is a 10 week old. Coryza says it effects 14 week and older. None of these sick chicks are smelly, but the rooster sure was.
     

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