Cost of Roasters? Added Addtional, Related Question in Post #14

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by 3KillerBs, Nov 4, 2009.

  1. 3KillerBs

    3KillerBs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    As an FYI for future planning, ...

    I bought several 7.5-8.5lb roasters in the grocery store for about $11-12/bird.

    About what would it cost to raise roasters of this size? Or, if its not possible to give a cost due to wide variations in the price of feed, how much feed would it take?

    I like larger chickens because I have a large family and if I only have a 3lb bird I end up having to cook 2 of them. I also prefer the firmer texture and richer flavor they get from being older.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2009
  2. the simple life

    the simple life Chillin' With My Peeps

    Alot would depend on whether you are processing them yourself and if not how much your local processor charges per bird.
    That is the biggest factor in my opinion and can vary greatly, I have seen people that pay less than two dollars per bird and then in my area it runs $5.00-$6.00 per bird.
    I would find out that first and then figure in feed, for feed its been said that a 50lb bag will do 4 birds until the average recommended processing time of 6-8 weeks, how much is a 50lb bag of broiler food in your area?
    The feed cost will go up if you decide to let your birds go longer than the recommended time to get them bigger than the average 4-6 lb range but then they can also start having heart attacks and you can lose them that way. That is a personal choice.
    Look into how much processing will cost in your area and how much it is for a 50 lb bag of feed and then you can figure it from there, or come back here and we can help you figure it out.
     
  3. 3KillerBs

    3KillerBs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'd be processing them myself.

    I haven't done the entire thing yet, but I've taken them from dead and skinned to chicken pot pie and, since I'm accustomed to buying whole chickens and cutting them myself its only a couple more steps.

    I'm in town and even if I can convince the town to permit laying hens I doubt they'd permit meaties, but I'm growing more and more frustrated with the difficulty in finding chickens that haven't been injected with "solution" or "broth" -- which usually contain something that makes my DH ill.
     
  4. doubled

    doubled Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:how would they know? chickens are chickens. if they are going to let you raise one but not the other that's just plain silly. buy "laying hens" and cull meaties...
     
  5. WalkingWolf

    WalkingWolf Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If you use rangers instead of Cornish X and free range the cost is very small. If you buy 25 birds you can look at $1 to $2 per chick, and then you will have to feed them for about a month depending on weather. I bought black broilers back in April, after a month I let them free range. It takes them longer to get big then the Cornish X, and they will have a more game flavor from free ranging but the cost is probably around $4 per bird. I then sell them for $15 roosters and $10 for hens. I do not process them that is up to the buyer.
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2009
  6. the simple life

    the simple life Chillin' With My Peeps

    It will be alot more cost effective for you since you are processing them yourself. You can probably raise them for a couple of dollars each in food, the chicks I bought this year cost between .85 a piece to $1.36 a piece ( 1.36 includes shipping).
    If you can make them a cheap enough pen or tractor using salvage materials it will be even better.
    I don't see how it would matter which type of chicken you are raising in regards to a permit but tell them what they want to hear.
    If you do the Cornish x you could have them raised up and processed before anyone even notices.
    They can be grown out in as little as 6-8 weeks and you do not have to free range them, so the neighbors won't even know you have them as long as you keep them from stinking up the place.
    I know alot of people complain about the smell but I have not had an issue with it yet, keep the area clean and feed them good clean feed and it makes a world of difference.
    Do you have an area that is well sheilded from the neighbors vision? This time of year people are not in their yards as much either.
    If you got the birds now and brooded them inside a garage or whatever for the first couple of weeks they would only be outside for a month or so.
     
  7. Bossroo

    Bossroo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    As a comparison for the Thanksgiving feast ( I already have 16 -- 5.052lb. average home grown Cornish X snoozing in my freezer camp)...The local grocery chain store is selling 5 pound whole friers for $0.67 a pound ...$3.45. Also, they are selling whole 4-5 pound already roasted in 3 flavors for $5.95. Turkeys are offered at $0.29 a pound.
     
  8. 3KillerBs

    3KillerBs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Will they grow into roasters before they crow?

    How much space would you need for ranging? I live on 3/4 of an acre in town. Its a corner lot so most of it is front yard.

    Can "free ranging" be done in the shade? We haven't really bothered to make lawn in the back yard under the trees, but I know that we could if we cared enough to do it. I don't care about lawn grass, but I'm willing to plant pasture. LOL
     
  9. 3KillerBs

    3KillerBs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:No, its a corner lot in town. Neighbors are close on both sides. They might or might not be OK with it. And I'd have to do some heavy-duty construction. Despite the town leash laws there are roaming dogs -- beagles in particular. And both neighbors have hunting-breed dogs. Good dogs, and they care about keeping them under control. But an invisible fence is not going to hold a rottie/not sure what cross that sees prey. You can't ask that of a dog.

    For either layers or meaties I'd have to do too much construction to keep covert chickens. [​IMG]
     
  10. 3KillerBs

    3KillerBs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I'll bet if you read the fine print all those cheap one have been injected with that "solution" or "broth".

    The cheapest I've found without it are $1.49/lb not on sale. The other ones are the $4.59/lb organic ones.
     

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