Coturnix Quail laying question

Discussion in 'Quail' started by wbruder17, Dec 5, 2011.

  1. wbruder17

    wbruder17 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 7, 2010
    Portland, OR
    Do Coturnix only lay eggs during a certain time of year? I have about a dozen that I hatched several months ago and I haven't gotten one egg yet. I have both the "jumbo" variety, tho they aren't very big at all, and some A&Ms. I can sex the jumbos and I KNOW I have several females, but can't sex the A&Ms, tho I've seen one crow once or twice. The males haven't been crowing att all either. What's the deal?
    Thanks!
     
  2. bfrancis

    bfrancis Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 30, 2010
    Okmulgee Co, Oklahoma
    They need a good feed and average 14 hours of light. Those are the brood basics...if those 2 criteria are met than you can go into the fine troubleshooting for additional potential problems.

    Hope this helps
     
  3. wbruder17

    wbruder17 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 7, 2010
    Portland, OR
    Thanks. They get good food (I think), but not the 14 hours of light! Do they need a layer feed and oyster shells like chickens? I just give them wild bird seed (looks just like the quail feed they sell at the feed store) and a 6 grain scratch, plus grass clippings every other day or so.
     
  4. bfrancis

    bfrancis Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 30, 2010
    Okmulgee Co, Oklahoma
    They need a good game bird feed with 24% protein or better...there are others on this forum that can get more into the feed requirements than I can. I don't think from what you have said you're feeding will give them all the nutrition that they need.
     
  5. The Critter Place

    The Critter Place Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 13, 2011
    Tucson, Az.
    Quote:X2

    Seeds should be more of a treat, not the majority of the diet.

    If you are feeding them a seeds, or any foods other than a game bird feed, then they do need the oyster shell or grit of some sort. Especially if in a wire cage off the ground.
     
  6. wbruder17

    wbruder17 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 7, 2010
    Portland, OR
    I inquired at our feed store what people buy to feed their quail and he showed me. It was mostly millet (i think that's right) with sunflower seeds etc. It looked almost exactly like wild bird seed. Plus the grains in the 6 grain scratch...corn, wheat, millet, sunflower seeds, and something else. This is no bueno? They have grit, as the run is on the ground and I added all kinds of stuff when I built it.

    I can check again at the feed store tomorrow, but they look and act very healthy and vibrant. Shiny, full feathers etc. We are rwally only getting about 9 hours of light, at best right now, with days where we don't see sun, only rain and clouds.
     
  7. Three basics need to be met to get/keep them laying in the fall and winter.

    1) Gamebird feed with lots of protein. 28 % protein is optimal. 26 % is alright. IF you can't get high protein feed then supplement 22 % starter with scrambled eggs or mealworms and the like.

    2) They must have a MINIMUM of 14 hours of light. Heat of some sort or warmth also promotes laying.

    3) Shelter from cold drafts and temperature swings.


    Any changes ( and yes I mean any ) will promote a stoppage in laying. This can be as small as changing to a different feeder or moving a cage or whatever.

    Wish the best for you.
     
  8. chickbird

    chickbird Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 4, 2009
    Bird Seed And Scratch Does Not Usually Have The Proper Amount Of Protein, A Good Many Of The Wild Bird Seed Is Only Around 9% Protein And Scratch Is Also Low. Add A Heat Light Really Helps As They Seem To Lay Better When Warm And With Adequate Light. Ask For A Gamebird Starter With 28-30 % Protein, And As Said Give The Seeds , A Little Each Day As A Treat.



















    5
     
  9. joe125

    joe125 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 20, 2010
    Stop with the seeds, just feed 28-30% protein Game Bird Feed! Get the perpetual sameness going, then you can experiment with seeds, meal worms, boiled eggs, cat feed or what ever strikes your fancy.
    Your main problem seams to be lighting. Of course obey, the proper housing requirements based on your local weather conditions.

    Coturnix will generally lay eggs just fine when the diet is right (28-30% GBS is fine), the lighting (14+ hours of full spectrum lighting) is right, plus perpetual sameness.

    Heat is generally irrelevant when you are raising birds outside. They don't respond well to rapid changes and may get egg loss, but will generally lay somewhere between 100 and -10 deg. F.. If given the proper feed and light.
     

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