Coturnix quail-natural history?

Discussion in 'Quail' started by ThiefPouter06, Apr 19, 2009.

  1. ThiefPouter06

    ThiefPouter06 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I seem to be able to find alot about these quail in captivity,But I am curious how do they live in the wild. For example, do they live in pairs, coveys or one cock, several hen groups? Grassland or prarie? Do they migrate for breeding purposes or is it weather related? I would think the key to getting more natural behaving quail (broody) would be to mimic their natural history and habitats. Any websites to point me to? The biologist in me demands to know this before I venture into their world lol. I read , study, plan well in advance before jumping into something.
     
  2. monarc23

    monarc23 Coturnix Obsessed

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  3. Lophura

    Lophura Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I love it, wish more took this approach!!!

    The origin of the captive "Coturnix" is debated. It is often widely believed that it is a domesticated Coturnix japonica, but japonica has also been considered a race of the Eurasion Migratory Quail Coturnix coturnix in the past. There is no reason not to believe that through their time in captivity, multiple races were used to get the bird that is now in America.

    Some great book resources for you and should be in every quail keepers library :

    Brown, D. 1995. A Guide to Pigeons, Doves & Quail, Their Management, Care & Breeding. ABK Publications, South Tweed Heads, Australia.
    Johnsgard, P.A. 1988. The Quails, Partridges, and Francolins of the World. Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK.
    Madge, S., McGowan, P. 2002. Pheasants, Partridges, and Grouse. Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ.

    In addition to Monarc's web resources, you can cruise through past articles of The AUK at http://www.aou.org/auk/index.php3

    Another one that people should check out - http://www.aviangenetics.com/

    You
    can visit my site's forum if you wish, most there are into the natural aviculture side of things and less in production.

    Dan
     
  4. citalk2much

    citalk2much Twilight Blessings Farm

    Dec 22, 2008
    GR MI: TN bound!
    Very nice info
    Thank you both!
     
  5. monarc23

    monarc23 Coturnix Obsessed

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    Jul 18, 2008
    Indiana, Pennsylvania
    Quote:I love it, wish more took this approach!!!

    The origin of the captive "Coturnix" is debated. It is often widely believed that it is a domesticated Coturnix japonica, but japonica has also been considered a race of the Eurasion Migratory Quail Coturnix coturnix in the past. There is no reason not to believe that through their time in captivity, multiple races were used to get the bird that is now in America.

    Some great book resources for you and should be in every quail keepers library :

    Brown, D. 1995. A Guide to Pigeons, Doves & Quail, Their Management, Care & Breeding. ABK Publications, South Tweed Heads, Australia.
    Johnsgard, P.A. 1988. The Quails, Partridges, and Francolins of the World. Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK.
    Madge, S., McGowan, P. 2002. Pheasants, Partridges, and Grouse. Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ.

    In addition to Monarc's web resources, you can cruise through past articles of The AUK at http://www.aou.org/auk/index.php3

    Another one that people should check out - http://www.aviangenetics.com/

    You
    can visit my site's forum if you wish, most there are into the natural aviculture side of things and less in production.

    Dan

    I know I'llbe rummaging through this when i have time [​IMG]
     
  6. ThiefPouter06

    ThiefPouter06 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you all. Looks like I will be busy.
     
  7. ThiefPouter06

    ThiefPouter06 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Very interesting. It would appear that they try to stay in a warm climate year round. "South for the winter". I wonder if the reason why they do not go broody in captivity is because of the loss of the natural instinct or because their natural habitats are not mimic. For example, many animals require certain seasonal cues to induce hormoes that trigger breeding responses. We know that many poultry require so many hours of daylight to produce eggs year round. I wonder if there could be a missing cue that is necessary to trigger broodiness? I realize that crossbreeding of subspecies and many generations of incubating could result in loss of broodiness but I wonder.....


    P.S. I am lazy and would rather the bird raise its young lol. Besides there is something missing in the whole artificial incubation thing.
     
  8. CheerfulChaos

    CheerfulChaos Out Of The Brooder

    Well, if I get any broody hens, I'll let you know! I'm in a dry, sub-tropical climate and my chickens lay all year round (except when they molt). I'm curious to see how my new quail will do in my very warm climate (triple digit temps for about 4 months). It almost never gets down to 32 degrees here and our "winter" is very short and mild. In fact a lot of the wild birds that head "south for the winter" seem to end up here. I have a fruiting banana tree in my front yard, and I don't even own a long-sleeved shirt. [​IMG] Of course, I'm not sure how much the quail will enjoy 118 degree weather, even if they are on my covered back patio under the ceiling fan and misters. [​IMG]
     
  9. Lophura

    Lophura Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Holden, Missouri
    Quote:Very interesting. It would appear that they try to stay in a warm climate year round. "South for the winter". I wonder if the reason why they do not go broody in captivity is because of the loss of the natural instinct or because their natural habitats are not mimic. For example, many animals require certain seasonal cues to induce hormoes that trigger breeding responses. We know that many poultry require so many hours of daylight to produce eggs year round. I wonder if there could be a missing cue that is necessary to trigger broodiness? I realize that crossbreeding of subspecies and many generations of incubating could result in loss of broodiness but I wonder.....


    P.S. I am lazy and would rather the bird raise its young lol. Besides there is something missing in the whole artificial incubation thing.

    I always prefer the natural incubation side of life when it is possible (I recently had to pull in a clutch of Elliot's eggs that were flooded) and feel that creating an aviary as natural as possible will give you the best opportunity to get this done. It's not laziness, I think it is far more enteraining to watch a family group in the aviary and instead of cleaning brooders, gives you more time to work elsewhere!! Another overlooked factor, many of our aviaries are the last sanctuary for a number of species. If re-introduction is to take place some day, are we going to be releasing birds that have no clue how to rear their young?

    I've had people swear up and down to me over the years that it is impossible for some species to go broody and rear their own chicks, I consider that a challenge and an invitation to try it!! The domestic Coturnix are so often crammed into tiny cages for the sole-purpose of production that basic natural behaviors are lost or not possible to perform in such an evironment.

    I certainly encourage and applaud what you are wanting to do, an aspect lost with so many.

    Dan
     
  10. ThiefPouter06

    ThiefPouter06 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think what I would do is put down several inches of sand as the substrate. Then spread dry leaves grasses and twigs throughout. Then I would gather some tufts of dead grass (pampas probably) and place here and there. Then near my window I would place a large tray and sow some millet. But I am wondering, would quail brooded by a hen (something small and brown and quail like, maybe a partridge silkie) have a better chance than those from a brooder? Toss in some crickets and mealworms and see what happens. I always dreamed of working in a zoo, think I am getting started on the coturnix exhibit lol.
     

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