Could I use these for brooding ducklings?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by iamcuriositycat, Sep 11, 2009.

  1. iamcuriositycat

    iamcuriositycat Chillin' With My Peeps

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  2. Cherlyn

    Cherlyn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sure, why not? I am jealous - I would love to get those for my quail!

    ~Cherlyn
     
  3. tallieb

    tallieb Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Those look like a great deal. Better get on them before someone else does.
     
  4. iamcuriositycat

    iamcuriositycat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I got 'em! Actually, I only bought two, but my dh wants to know if I even needed that many, and I don't! [​IMG]

    One of the two I bought divides in half so it can be a single large brooder or two small. The other is a medium-sized brooder.

    The roofs were in bad shape and will have to be replaced--I plan to use metal roofing, which is cheap at Lowe's, and easy to install, and will last forever. One has a side panel that is rotting and needs replaced. But the structures themselves are sturdy as all get-out, and basically in great shape.

    The floors are wire, which I figure for the first few days I'll cover in straw or a towel, to protect their little feet. It will stay drier and cleaner, though, and I think they'll appreciate that after the first week when they are oh so very messy.

    Now let me ask you this: Both hutches have some walls that are solid wood and some that are hardware mesh. With tiny ducklings... do I need to put the brooders inside a larger structure, such as the garage, to protect them? Are there predators of ducklings that will tear through the hardware mesh?

    Also, how large an opening does a snake (one large enough to eat a duckling) need to get in and steal a duckling? The structures are pretty tight, but they both have a couple gaps that are about an inch wide. Should be easy enough to cover with more hardware mesh, but I'm wondering whether I have to.

    I'll have to add brood lamps, probably suspended from the top so I can raise and lower as their needs change. But I'm pretty set up, and have way more room than I need. SOOO... what can I hatch next?? [​IMG]
     
  5. cracking up

    cracking up Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I found out the hard way that a weasel can get through a very small opening and a bobcat can open a dog crate. I think I would cover the inch opening if you know you have a snake or even think you might. Feed store said 1/4 inch hardware cloth for the weasel. At least the cages are pretty far off the ground, that'll help for small animals but make it harder to get the ducks in the cage at night. It's a good trade off. I think they look like a good buy. Congrats!
     
  6. iamcuriositycat

    iamcuriositycat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks, cracking! I'll definitely cover that opening, then. And the 1/4 inch hardware cloth is good enough protection?

    A bobcat can open a dog crate?? What???? The ducklings right now are in a rubbermaid container in a dog crate in the garage--I guess the garage protects against bobcat--but will these brooders be strong enough to stand up to one if I keep them outside as I was planning? And I *was* keeping the older ducklings in the dog crate at night--under a lean-to! I had no idea they weren't safe there! Thank goodness no mishaps! They're in a chain link run now.

    We have about everything you can imagine for this part of the country--snakes, racoons, possums, bobcat, coyotes, fox, hawks, owls, you name it! So I am trying to cover all my bases.

    I'm not worried about getting them in at night--they already have to be lifted into the rubbermaid when I put them up, so that's nothing new. They'll only stay in the brooder cages for a few weeks anyway, and then move up to the chain link runs, where they will be trained to go in on their own at night.

    Thanks again!
     

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