could it be a sex-linked rouen? pic.

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by roocrazy, Jul 21, 2011.

  1. roocrazy

    roocrazy Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 11, 2009
    minnesota!!!!
    could one of my mallard drakes carry the sex-link gene... because i have had 3 ducklings in the past that look like this
    [​IMG]
    but i still have grey females, so i am confused.
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2011
  2. roocrazy

    roocrazy Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 11, 2009
    minnesota!!!!
    nobody knows?
     
  3. roocrazy

    roocrazy Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 11, 2009
    minnesota!!!!
    or just a mutation?
     
  4. KansasKid

    KansasKid Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 7, 2010
    South East Kansas
    Look at your other post, i quoted some genetics info. Most likely it has either a mix somewhere in earlier generations or just a one in a hundred lighter color mutation.
     
  5. Senna95

    Senna95 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 6, 2010
    Woodland
    Do all of your adults look normal? If so, it COULD be a sex-linked recessive brown dilution. One of your males could carry it, and pass it along to the offspring. It would only show in the females........ so are the young ones that show this females?

    Do you have any photos of them as adults?
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2011
  6. rollyard

    rollyard Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 31, 2010
    It is sex-linked recessive brown dilution @ work!

    If none of your breeding birds are white (hides colour/pattern) or have blue (can make brown difficult to see), or show evidence of brown, then the brown duckling is female! At least one of your drakes will carry hidden one dose of the gene (brown) & it has been inherited by the three brown ducklings produced. The brown duckling could only be a young drake if the mother had it also to pass on but you should see evidence of brown in her if she has the gene (hemizygous for it), unless as previously stated she is white or has blue also!

    You have still bred grey females because the drake is D+/d. Think of it like this; he (the D+/d drake) can pass on either brown (d) or not brown (D+ is wild-type or grey) to his daughters. Approx 50% will inherit brown while the other 50% will inherit "not brown" according to probability. So some grey daughters & some brown daughters.
     
  7. roocrazy

    roocrazy Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 11, 2009
    minnesota!!!!
    Quote:this is awesome. ill have to test the drakes now. thank you soo muh for your help, rollyard, kansaskid, and senna 95(i do not have pics of adults, i am just building the rest of my flock up with the three survivors of a doh attack. im up to 18!!!!!

    i hope this is... illl start selling hatching eggs this fall!!
     
  8. Senna95

    Senna95 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 6, 2010
    Woodland
    Half of your females should show brown dilution, or 25% of your hatch. Thats assuming all from the same drake.
     
  9. roocrazy

    roocrazy Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 11, 2009
    minnesota!!!!
    i have two drakes.
     

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