Could use some help with prolapsed hen

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by All my hens are roosters, Apr 9, 2009.

  1. All my hens are roosters

    All my hens are roosters Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 18, 2008
    This is the second hen this season who has prolapsed. The first one didn't survive, so I'm hoping to have better luck this time.

    I'm pretty sure I caught her early enough yesterday, she was not at all distressed (wings up, still perky) at the time. She was isolated into the laundry tub.

    Upon examination, it appeared that the egg shell membrane was wrapped around the prolapsed bits - as if the egg had inverted or something. This was removed carefully, the area rinsed with warm water and the parts returned inside. She was bleeding moderately. I lubricated the area with bag balm. I could not feel another egg inside. She was given water but no food. Crop is full. She had enough energy to escape the tub and go wandering.

    Today the wings are down, although she is otherwise looking okay - eyes are bright. She has been some discharging mucous-like substance - not a lot. She has not prolapsed again.

    While I'm not overly optimistic she will make it, I do have a couple of questions in hopes of saving her.

    When replacing the prolapsed bits, am I correct in assuming these came out inside out, and should be repositioned accordingly?

    There has been no poo, so I'm concerned that she may not be able to expel or is going internally.

    Any advice would be appreciated.

    EDIT: Well, she didn't make it. Since I have seen this twice now with the same results, I'm not sure whether this is something I'm capable of helping them survive. At least she didn't suffer long.
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2009
  2. LynneP

    LynneP Chillin' With My Peeps

    I'm impressed with what you have accomplished so far and as I understand it, she might continue to produce egg material so one has to continue to be vigilant. Do you think her crop contains undigested food or a bit of grit? A little oil soaked bread might be suitable to keep her calorie load up but her digestive system narrowed and lubed. Is she receiving any of the following in her water-
    vitamins
    electrolytes and/or Gatorade
    honey or sugar?

    Her energy level will continue to be a key issue as she repositions and heals.
    Do your have any Preparation H? The original kind without the added painkiller, which is lethal for chickens.

    Some references-

    http://www.agric.gov.ab.ca/livestock/poultry/prolapse.html
    http://www.poultryhelp.com/prolapse.html
    http://www.geocities.com/KelliAnn293/healthproblems.htm#Egg binding


    and of course if you search here at BYC under prolapse you will be cable to communicate with members who have been through this.

    Caught your edit- so sorry you lost her...[​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2009
  3. All my hens are roosters

    All my hens are roosters Out Of The Brooder

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    22
    Feb 18, 2008
    Thanks Lynne.

    She was in pretty bad shape when I found her, even though she wasn't acting like it. The last one I lost wasn't bleeding as much as this poor girl, and the smell of the discharge was pretty bad.

    I had researched this here the last time I went through this, much thanks to the forum even when the outcome isn't what was hoped for.

    Services will be held soon. Donations to BYC in place of flowers (or tomatoes or other chicken treats).

    Thanks for the links, I hope I won't need them again, but also hope they help someone else!
     
  4. LynneP

    LynneP Chillin' With My Peeps

    I'm very sorry to hear this, I know that prolapse is very difficult to treat and that success, even among experienced farmers, is at a low rate. I did find something that might assist you in future planing, though. Apparently when the hen is straining she uses up more than the calcium available in her cells, and it is possible if she was a big-egg layer that her calcium requirements are higher than most other hens. So even if the layer feed is enriched with oyster shell it doesn't hurt to supplement with more calcium in the form of ground shells. The other thing I was told, and this by 'someone who knows' is that if you are able to treat a hen with Prep-H that you should sprinkle sugar on the exposted portion of the inner vent as you apply the ointment. Apparently it helps the Prep-H to be absorbed by her cells. Still, it's one of the toughest ailments to treat. Oh my...and someone who is getting blood on eggs has posted...found out it can be a prelude to prolapse...I'm so lucky to have solid poultry folk nearby. Again, I am so sorry.
     
  5. All my hens are roosters

    All my hens are roosters Out Of The Brooder

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    0
    22
    Feb 18, 2008
    Thanks again Lynne. I hate losing my girls, but this is one of those things that once it happens I'd be very surprised for them to recover from - not that I wouldn't try to help. I'm just glad the end wasn't prolonged.

    I'm already supplementing crushed oyster shell. My one bard rock aside, all my girls are bantams now, but still, it can't be easy laying eggs every day.

    I've bookmarked the links you posted just in case.
     
  6. Renee

    Renee Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 7, 2008
    CALIFORNIA
    Sorry about your hens.
    You really did a good job, and got great advice.
     

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