Could you guys give me some tips, I am recieving my first batch of...

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by rebecca10782, Oct 20, 2008.

  1. rebecca10782

    rebecca10782 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 24, 2008
    babies tommorow [​IMG]
    I have read everything I need to, but I would like to know if anyone has any other tips.
     
  2. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    Nov 9, 2007
    SW Arkansas
    Have everything ready tonight. The post office may call you very early. Be sure and plug in your heat lamps before you go to pick them up or even plug it in tonight.
    When you get them into where it's warm by the brooder, take them out of the box individually and dip their beaks in the water. Then set them down in their feed. If you have those long feeders that have holes in the top for them to put their heads thru, it's best to remove the tops for a few days. Yes, they'll poop in the feed, but they need easy access to it.
    Once they've all been introduced to their water and feed, sit back and take a deep breath.
    After that just keep an eye on your thermometer and more important than that, watch your chicks. A cold chick is peeping alot and huddling under the heat lamp. A hot chick is getting as far away from the heat lamp as possible. You want them to be moving around, in and out of the light, checking out their new enviroment.
    Good luck with them!
     
  3. rebecca10782

    rebecca10782 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 24, 2008
    Thanks! I am soooooo excited. I don't think I will even be able to sleep, I'm gonna be in there watching them all the time. I have never seen a new born chick. I am experienced with raising new born kittens. But they have mama to care for them. Are chicks like kittens and puppies? Do they sleep most of the time? Can you handle them too much?
     
  4. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

    28,907
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    Nov 9, 2007
    SW Arkansas
    Rebecca, while others might disagree with me I do believe you can handle them too much in the first few days. A large foreign creature (that woud be us) scooping them up every half hour or more is bound to stress them out. They don't need additional stress while they are learning their way around their world.
    So pick them up at random, talk to them for a few seconds, admire their cute little faces, then return them to the brooder. You'll have plenty of time to interact with them after they've adjusted.
    It's also a good idea to sit down as close to their level as you can. Stop and think about it. What is a bird that's a frequent prey to larger birds gonna think when something large hovers over them and then swoops them up? I'd be scared too.
     
  5. rebecca10782

    rebecca10782 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 24, 2008
    Yes, very true. I wasn't thinking about the fact that they will be in a new, scary enviornment.
     
  6. Bandana

    Bandana Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:In my experience, chicks are like kittens and puppies in many ways. They are small, cute, loveable, and also vulnerable. Sometimes they are very hardy in ways you wouldn't expect, but there are also a few things to look out for. Like other baby animals, they can become dehydrated fairly quickly, and they need to eat frequently, or their blood sugar will drop too low. The little bodies are just too small to store much, and most of what they take in is used up quickly, just to maintain life and continue to develope. They'll need easy access to fresh water and feed. Keep them warm, but not overheated.

    Sounds like you have done, and are doing your homework. Happy fuzzy-butts! [​IMG]
     

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