Counteracting high humidity

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Time-Out, Oct 11, 2011.

  1. Time-Out

    Time-Out Chillin' With My Peeps

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    For the first 5 days, some of my eggs were subjected to high humidity. Would you keep humidity low for the rest of the incubation to balance the high, or would you carry on as normal and 'pretend' there was a storm?

    I also forgot to weigh the eggs first... so no help there [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2011
  2. Gypsy07

    Gypsy07 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hmmm... What humidity would you normally run them at, and what were they subjected to?
    And you say 'some' of them? Meaning some of them weren't?
    How many eggs in total, and how many were over-humidified?

    If it was just some of them, and just for five days, I think I might just run the rest of the incubation at the normal humidity.

    If it was most of them, and it was a REALLY high humidity, I'd probably run it dry for a few days before replacing the water and then running it as normal again. I know it would probably be better to run the rest of the incubation at a slightly lower humidity than normal, rather than subjecting them to another extreme, but if I wasn't sure what kind of moisture loss rate a slightly lower humidity would produce, I'd rather run them dry till the air cells came into line with what I was used to seeing at a particular stage of development, then proceed as normal from there on...

    [​IMG] Just my ideas on it...
     
  3. Time-Out

    Time-Out Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The Peak District, UK
    10 out of 14 had 40% humdidity for their first day, then 80% for the next four. After that, they were at 30% for two before I got worried and added a sponge, so they've been at about 40-45% for the past 3 days.

    The four other eggs, of which two look dead, were at about 35% for the first two days, then joined the others at 40-45%. They were set 6 days later (arrived late).

    Trouble is, this incubator they're testing is a second hand rcom 20 pro. Much as it's brilliant, I think the humidity rods need replacing as it isn't getting the humidity to where I would like it to be.

    I've taken the sponge out again now, so humidity has dropped to 30%. These are shipped eggs and the aircells all look very wonky. Wonky aircells always look bigger than normal ones, which is why I put the sponge back in sooner than I'd planned. I probably made things a lot more difficult by setting them too soon, but the sellers were offering replacement if less than 50% were developping by day 8. I could hardly wait a week and then set them. It'd have been unfair on the sellers and their policy wouldn't have stood.
     
  4. Barbedwirecat

    Barbedwirecat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would try running a dry humidity through the rest of the incubation. I had the same issue you did and ended up pulling the water and running dry. I also ended up delaying lock down a day because the eggs had not lot enough weight/ moisture. I delayed until the first pip. My eggs look pretty darn healthy so far. I ran at 25-35% humidity after the first 2 days of it being too high.
     
  5. Time-Out

    Time-Out Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The Peak District, UK
    Great, thanks. Are yours hatching as we speak? What was your humidity at in the first two days?
     

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