AQuailTale

In the Brooder
Nov 23, 2020
16
21
26
Oregon
I'm building a large aviary for my new flock of coturnix quail. I'm doing a brooding experiment, having my quail hatched by another farmer, and taking them "under my wing". When should I have the newbies move into the aviary? I'm doing a survival of the fittest type beginning, with a hands off approach in their maturity so they can live the most natural life possible. Am going to see if I can get a consistent line of brooding coturnix quail that just do their thing. Ill still collect eggs but the experiment is what Im most invested in. Id like to see them raising their own babies and teaching them natural quail skills.

My 2 questions:

At what age should I get my quail from her in order for them to not be super used to human interaction, without them dying alone in the aviary?

And do coturnix quail do other color eggs besides brown speckled and blue? Would like to get some variety. Am going to do some cross breeding of the different sub lines of this breed.
 

Peristeria

Songster
Jul 4, 2020
172
198
141
I'm building a large aviary for my new flock of coturnix quail. I'm doing a brooding experiment, having my quail hatched by another farmer, and taking them "under my wing". When should I have the newbies move into the aviary? I'm doing a survival of the fittest type beginning, with a hands off approach in their maturity so they can live the most natural life possible. Am going to see if I can get a consistent line of brooding coturnix quail that just do their thing. Ill still collect eggs but the experiment is what Im most invested in. Id like to see them raising their own babies and teaching them natural quail skills.

My 2 questions:

At what age should I get my quail from her in order for them to not be super used to human interaction, without them dying alone in the aviary?

And do coturnix quail do other color eggs besides brown speckled and blue? Would like to get some variety. Am going to do some cross breeding of the different sub lines of this breed.
Very neat idea! How cold is it where you are? Is it possible to just put a heat lamp out there and get them at an age where they can mostly take care of themselves? :pop
 

Nabiki

Quail Geek
Premium Feather Member
May 15, 2019
9,199
59,099
1,046
Sonoma County, CA
They should be fine outside at around 6 weeks. Having them used to humans isn't a bad thing, because they are likelier to be less stressed by your presence. Stressed birds don't lay well and are unlikely to go broody.

I have heard people claim that there are other colour eggs, but I have never seen any other than blue or speckled.
 

AQuailTale

In the Brooder
Nov 23, 2020
16
21
26
Oregon
Very neat idea! How cold is it where you are? Is it possible to just put a heat lamp out there and get them at an age where they can mostly take care of themselves? :pop

It's not too cold but I could do a heat lamp(Ill judge that when it's finished. I'll sit in there and read for a while). So you think 4-6 weeks or wait til they're already laying?
 

AQuailTale

In the Brooder
Nov 23, 2020
16
21
26
Oregon
They should be fine outside at around 6 weeks. Having them used to humans isn't a bad thing, because they are likelier to be less stressed by your presence. Stressed birds don't lay well and are unlikely to go broody.

I have heard people claim that there are other colour eggs, but I have never seen any other than blue or speckled.

Thank you for the response to the egg question-I thought I just wasn't finding them.

And I mean I just want them to live a peaceful and natural existence. They'll see me and I'll be the bringer of food, but I want them living their most natural life possible. For the brooding but mostly because that's the best quality of life, in my opinion, for a wild bird turned domesticated. Kind of paying respect to where they come from.
 

Peristeria

Songster
Jul 4, 2020
172
198
141
It's not too cold but I could do a heat lamp(Ill judge that when it's finished. I'll sit in there and read for a while). So you think 4-6 weeks or wait til they're already laying?
I was just thinking that maybe you could brood them in their enclosure. I have never ground raised before but if you set up an auto waterer and feeder they wouldnt see you as much. I do agree with nabiki though. If you are going to collect eggs they will be scared. I've heard of people who have had them as pets go broody and one of my girls (shes a pet too) went broody for a few days.
 

AQuailTale

In the Brooder
Nov 23, 2020
16
21
26
Oregon
I was just thinking that maybe you could brood them in their enclosure. I have never ground raised before but if you set up an auto waterer and feeder they wouldnt see you as much. I do agree with nabiki though. If you are going to collect eggs they will be scared. I've heard of people who have had them as pets go broody and one of my girls (shes a pet too) went broody for a few days.

Do you think me bringing the food will be enough of a relationship where they wouldnt be stressed out by my presence when collecting?
 

HillGuy

Chirping
Jun 2, 2020
99
164
93
21019082-B748-4856-8BC4-0FE252369897.jpeg
I happen to have these egg pictures
D4751E50-41B2-411C-8B03-F19171D870FD.jpeg
9159DCEC-1330-4E9A-8D1D-727EA642A4D7.jpeg
 

AQuailTale

In the Brooder
Nov 23, 2020
16
21
26
Oregon
If you're worried about them being petlike, don't worry. They seem to be more reserved than larger poultry. I have one I can hold without too much panic, but I still have to catch him first

No, more like I want to see if they'll all go broody and I can get them a few generations into brooding. I feel the best chance at the highest success rate is the most natural, wild type environment possible. With me bringing food so their short interactions with me are as the food bringer:)
 

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