Couple questions PLEASE for experienced hatchers

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by mstrrlm, Oct 9, 2011.

  1. mstrrlm

    mstrrlm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 23, 2011
    Picayune, MS
    This morning and tonight I saw my Barred Rock Rooster mounting my laying Golden Laced Wyandotte Hen and hear or my questions about incubating the eggs

    1. What would the chicks look like with BR Roo and GLW Hen?

    2. How long after breeding will the eggs be fertile (ie. 2 weeks)

    3. It is between 32 degrees and 40 degrees at night and first thing in morning, will this cause a problem with using them to hatch?

    4. How long can I hold the eggs before placing them into the incubator for hatching?

    5. And how should I hold them (ie. on the counter or in fridge etc...)?
     
  2. leghornlover@123

    [email protected] Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 8, 2011
    Santa Fe, Nm
    ok well what ive learned is that the chicken has a remarkable reproductive system once an egg is fertile its always fertile if you put them in a fridge it doesnt kill the egg i just lowers the chances of it hatching same as for it being 40-50 degrees it can still hatch
     
  3. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Feb 2, 2009
    Northwest Arkansas
    1. What would the chicks look like with BR Roo and GLW Hen?

    The chicks would look a whole lot like the BR rooster. The chicks would start out with mainly black down and a white spot on the head, but final adult feathering would be black and white barred like the BR rooster. There might be a little red leaking through, but probably not much.

    2. How long after breeding will the eggs be fertile (ie. 2 weeks)

    It takes about 25 hours for an egg to make its way through the hen's internal egg production factory. The egg can only be fertilized in the first 15 minutes of that journey. So if the mating took place on a Sunday, Sunday's egg is definitely not fertile. That egg started on Saturday. Monday's egg might or might not be fertile. It depends on what time of day the mating took place and when the egg started it's journey. Tuesday's egg would be fertile.

    A hen will normally lay fertile eggs for about 2 weeks after a mating. It could be as little as 9 days and could be for as long as three weeks or maybe a bit longer, but two weeks is a pretty good guess.

    3. It is between 32 degrees and 40 degrees at night and first thing in morning, will this cause a problem with using them to hatch?

    Not sure what you are asking here. If a broody hen is setting on them, they will stay warm. That is her job. Gather them daily until you put them in the incubator or under a broody hen, just don't leave them out overnight. It takes a pretty good while for the egg to cool off that much after it is laid, but if you leave it out overnight in those temperatures, it is not real good for hatching eggs. It's not that they absolutely won't hatch, but that some are likely not to hatch if they get that cold all the way through.

    4. How long can I hold the eggs before placing them into the incubator for hatching?

    A week without any problem. Two weeks without much of a problem as long as you store them properly. Not too hot and turn them.

    5. And how should I hold them (ie. on the counter or in fridge etc...)?

    You don't want to refrigerate them. If possible try to keep them around 60 degrees or so if you have a good place you can do that. Most of us don't, so try to keep them in as cool a place as you can. The refrigerator is too cool though. Some will probably hatch but you often don't get real good hatch rates with refrigerated eggs.

    If you have an automatic turner, plug it in and keep the eggs in it. They need to be turned a few times each day to keep the yolk from settling to one side. You need to store them pointy side down. The air sac is in the flat end of the egg and that needs to be kept on top so it stays where it needs ot be.
     

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