Coyote Creek Soy-Free Layer--Label and Ingredients

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by CityBird, Dec 6, 2012.

  1. CityBird

    CityBird New Egg

    2
    0
    7
    Dec 6, 2012
    I could not find the ingredients in the Coyote Creek Organic Soy-Free Layer chicken feed anywhere, including the producer's web site coyotecreekfarm.org, so I'm posting it here. This is from a bag I purchased in Houston at Wabash in Dec. 2012. Cost was $45 for a 50# bag. Attached images are of the label and 1/3 cup spread on a piece of paper.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  2. countrygoddess

    countrygoddess Chillin' With My Peeps

    I guess I'd want to know what the "grain products", "plant protein products", and "grain by-products" are, but that's just me... It looks pretty good, though. I think I see some corn, peas, wheat, possibly some oats, and sunflower kernels in there. Thanks for posting!
     
  3. CityBird

    CityBird New Egg

    2
    0
    7
    Dec 6, 2012
  4. CoyoteCreek

    CoyoteCreek New Egg

    3
    1
    8
    Oct 31, 2013
    Hi CityBird and CountryGoddess,

    I apologize for not seeing this post sooner!! For a brief moment, I decided to go the generic route with our labeling to allow for changes in ingredients due to the drought. However, I quickly realized the approach wasn't transparent, as all labeling should be. Regardless, I have attached the soy-free layer feed formulation ingredients and nutrition to this post. You may notice a slight boost in performance from the previous feed formulation. As always, we use and support Texas grown organic grains, as our mission is to not only support our local economy, but to also increase organic grain production in our state. Our feed is certified organic, and it's verified to never contain harmful pesticides, herbicides, hormones, pharmaceuticals, or GMOs.

    I always have an open line for questions or comments, and I encourage feedback.

    Cameron
    512-285-2556 (office)
    [email protected]









    [​IMG]
     
    1 person likes this.
  5. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

    3,495
    548
    318
    Mar 6, 2008
    Northern California
    With animal proteins, the shelf life must be shorter than typical feeds. I never buy more feed than I can use in a month. What is the shelf life of this feed compared to others? I'm glad to see superior replacement of soy in this feed ration. Unfortunately many so-called soy free rations replace soy with canola meal. Which is why I have no problem with soy, so long as it is certified organic soy.
     
  6. CoyoteCreek

    CoyoteCreek New Egg

    3
    1
    8
    Oct 31, 2013
    Hi Michael,

    The shelf life of a feed will largely depend on how it is stored, and it's true that animal proteins typically have a shorter shelf life. For all our feed varieties, we recommend keeping them as fresh as possible. However, if that is not possible, then we prefer the feed be used within two to three months of purchase.

    It's always best to store the feed in a cool and dry location, away from as much humidity as possible, and away from critters that could get into it.

    Fortunately, all our ingredients are certified organic, so the soy in our soy containing feeds is too. We have very extensive production procedures in place to prevent GMO contamination, and we test every single load and field to ensure this.
     
  7. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

    3,495
    548
    318
    Mar 6, 2008
    Northern California
    Thanks Cameron. Yes, how feed is stored is important, animal ingredients or not. Fish meal has often been preserved with a synthetic preservative known as ethoxyquin. It inhibited fungal growth which made it popular: http://www.pesticideinfo.org/Detail_Chemical.jsp?Rec_Id=PC35089

    This preservative was banned in dog food some years ago due to it's link to cancer and other toxic reactions. Where do you acquire your crab and fish meal? And how is it tested for toxins?
     
  8. CoyoteCreek

    CoyoteCreek New Egg

    3
    1
    8
    Oct 31, 2013
    Our menhaden fish meal supply is sustainable harvest certified, and it must be wild caught for it's use in certified organic products. The producer has also agreed to supply me with an analysis of each batch produced for us. To verify their claims, we also test the fish for nutrition. The meals are tested for toxins and more intensively, for mercury. Neither our fish, nor our crab have ever had mercury levels of more than 0.01ppm by wet weight. The Stone Crab meal comes from Nova Scotia to Mexico. It's crab that didn't pass the visual test for human consumption, but it is nutritionally equivalent. The crab meal is what we call a sustainable reutilization process because it would otherwise end up in a landfill. Both the fish and the crab are cooked, dried, and then milled into meals.

    Fish meal can have higher levels of mercury, but that largely depends on what type of fish is used to produce the fish meal. At Coyote Creek Organic Feed Mill, we only use naturally preserved menhaden fish meal. Very few feed mills use menhaden fish meal, and even fewer use naturally preserved fish meals. Typically, cheap white fish meals are used, and they tend to have much higher levels of mercury.

    Not all fish meal is of the same quality, though in all the menhaden fish meal that is produced, mercury is not a concern. Mother Jones states, "If you're concerned about high mercury levels in farmed salmon or tuna, menhaden may start to sound more appealing. Unlike most fatty fish, plankton-swilling menhaden eat near the bottom of the food chain and have low mercury levels, 0.01 ppm (wet weight)." In addition, the Greenpeace Research Lab published the following study comparing mercury levels in menhaden fish meal to fish oils. The research confirms the statements made by Mother Jones.

    Beyond mercury in the fish, a big concern with fish meal is how the product is preserved. Most fish meal, like you stated, have been preserved with ethoxyquin or other highly toxic preservatives. Our fish meal is preserved with Naturox IPO antioxidant. It has an organic sunflower oil base carrier.​

    Hope this information helps!

     
  9. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

    3,495
    548
    318
    Mar 6, 2008
    Northern California
    It certainly does. Thank you for the explanation. I hope your product sells well and keeps you going. Perhaps some of your rations could make it this way in Northern California someday. I'd like to give it a try.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by