Coyote/wolf issue...possible fencing ideas?

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by tlouiselle, May 19, 2016.

  1. tlouiselle

    tlouiselle Out Of The Brooder

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    We have been living in NC for about a month now. Our property backs up to woods on 2 sides. We are working on secure chicken runs at the moment. Everyone is safe at night locked up. I like to let my chickens free range. About 2 weeks ago, at 3:30pm, I chased away what was either a pair of HUGE coyotes or red wolves with one of my chickens. There has been no signs since...until today. My chickens were screaming. I ran out...they had taken one of my favorite hens. They came from the woods, through the yard, and right up to the fence we have for the dogs VERY close to the house. Her first pile of feathers are right there. I followed the feather and blood piles into the woods until I lost the trail.

    I am mad, even with secure pens, they are not safe if they free range. On top of it...that fence will keep my little dogs in, but is an easy hop for these coyotes/wolves. So in broad daylight, everyone is a sitting duck.

    I am thinking that high fence along the treeline, with electric wire on the OUTSIDE...bottom, middle, and top...would deter them. They would have to go to the road, and then around the house to the back yard in the middle of the day to get anything...THAT would be pretty bold. Does anyone have experience with something like this? Does it work? Any tips???
     
  2. ejcrist

    ejcrist Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm thinking they are Eastern Coyotes which are larger than their Western counterparts.Unfortunately for chicken owners they are extremely persistent and smart. I doubt there's much you can do to guarantee protection except keep your birds in a secure coop w/run. If you live in a rural area where you're allowed to trap or shoot the coyotes you can get rid of them that way, however; where there are one or a pair you will likely have others move in to claim their undeclared territory. I've heard of people having success using electric fencing but coyotes can jump quite high - they can clear a 6' block wall like it wasn't even there, so if I were in your shoes I'd opt for a secure coop/run. If not you're going to have a lot of losses.
     
  3. tlouiselle

    tlouiselle Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you. I did see them the first time. I have seen a lot of coyotes and didn't second guess them like I did these though. So I am not 100% sure what we are dealing with. You can get in trouble here for killing a wolf mistaking it for a coyote. I know nothing is 100% guranteed. But I have to do something. I am not losing my dogs to these. The fact that they came right up to the house/fence at the time they did is a pretty bold move. I was thinking a 6 foot wire fence. Electric. Barbed wire on top if I have to.
     
  4. rottlady

    rottlady Chillin' With My Peeps

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    sheep/goat lectro netting will helpbut not 100 especially not when they have pups. best plan is secure coops and chicken tractors for daytime "free ranging" INSIDE the lectro net

    We have everything from bears/bobcats/coyotes on down to tiny weasels here + Goshawks etc. NO chicken can ever be loose here or it dies
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2016
  5. tlouiselle

    tlouiselle Out Of The Brooder

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    I'm looking into the netting to at least line the back wooded area. I am also very concerned about our dogs. We have 2 min pins and a chihuahua...all under 7 lbs. We put up a wrought iron garden fencing area for them close to the house. But the coyote cam right up to that today. So I know nothing is 100% but I need to do everything I can to deter them. I'm not losing my dogs to them.

    I ordered a trail cam today too. I have not seen signs of anything trying to get in the coop at night. But hopefully when they come back I can see what they are for sure.

    Just so mad.
     
  6. ejcrist

    ejcrist Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Do you live in a rural area where you're allowed to take 'em out without the neighbors complaining? Personally I wouldn't think twice to do it since you have pets and livestock (actually poultry) at risk. Wildlife that isn't afraid of humans is a recipe for disaster whether it's bears, javelina, or coyotes. That'll definitely take care of the threat for now until you can put up the proper security barriers. Just like rottlady said, I have every predator known to mankind except bears come through my yard about every night so like her, free range is out for me, at least if I want to have chickens for more than a few days anyway. Sounds like you're in a similar situation so for the long-term I'd strongly consider a very secure coop and run combination. Trying to keep chickens in predator country is like trying to grow beans next to a groundhog hole.
     
    1 person likes this.
  7. Folly's place

    Folly's place Chicken Obsessed

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    Electric poultry fencing is good for many ground predators (see premier1supplies.com) and only a very secure coop and run will really protect your flock all the time. Small dogs are 'panther bait' and will be taken by coyotes and wolves in daytime in your fenced yard, so need serious protection. Find out what the laws are in your county about predators; generally shooting coyotes attacking your animals is fine. I don't know about red wolves; are they protected? Act before you have a disaster, so everyone is safer. Mary
     
  8. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    The electrified poultry netting works well but get the taller stuff. If the larger canid defeats netting by jumping it then you can setup another perimeter of hotwire using a single wire 1 foot off ground and 1 foot outside of netting. The wire makes so predator can not as easily position to jump without getting zapped.
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2016
  9. cscigu

    cscigu Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I just have to jump in that I agree with how tough it is to keep coyotes at bay once they learn you have chickens. I live in the country, and coyotes are very thick, therefore very hungry. I completely understand why they return to free chicken dinners. (my chickens also run loose) I have always had a German Shepherd on the place, which is the most effective control I know of. Still, when my prior dog became old, with poor eyes and ears, they learned to sneak in. After his death, I got another from a rescue. The coyotes were totally unprepared for this boy.

    I know that having a German Shepherd, or similar large, protective dog, is not possible for everyone. Nor is letting such a dog run loose. Its just sometimes the most effective way to deal with coyotes.

    Though I've not used the electrified netting, I would think it, or even a few strands of electric fence would be effective. I use electric fence for cows. If a dog hits that fence, he'll stay clear for weeks. Electric fence might be unsightly for some, but is is easier to use than ever. The new nylon-type line can be cut with scissors, tied together, pulled tight more easily...its good stuff. Not nearly as hard to install as you might think.

    Obviously, the netting would give better coverage than typical electric fence. Still, if the netting is too expensive or large for your tastes, you might try two strands of regular electric fence line along your perimeter that backs up to the woods, I think it would be a strong deterrent at least. I could give any details you need, or check Youtube.
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2016
  10. rottlady

    rottlady Chillin' With My Peeps

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    at the farm they have high tension 3 strand high voltage electric fence for Highland cattle on the farm husband works. It does NOT keep weasels, fox, coyote or even bear out of the pastures. They figure out how to slid under or through. Electric netting (the tallest you can get) surrounding a coop/run and livestock that is also contained by another pen is the safest way to keep predators from them. Even so chickens loose in this environment-even supervised- are still easy prey for Goshawks and large hawks and eagles
    You have to decide what level of safety you want and what level of losses are acceptable.
    For me no level of loss is acceptable so no free range chickens here. They will either be in a coop/covered pen or a chicken tractor. Then again my birds were expensive. Maybe if they were $5 barnyard mixes I'd feel differently
     

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