Coyotes and other predators

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by rgvchick, Mar 4, 2017.

  1. rgvchick

    rgvchick Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 9, 2016
    Mercedes, TX
    I live on the outskirts of town and have free range chickens. My (6 acre) property is fenced, but the fencing is for goats and my chickens go through to surrounding acreage. Last year, I lost more than a dozen chickens to coyotes..and maybe some dogs. They attacked in the morning when there was light out so I did see the coyotes. I managed to scare them off and hadn't had a problem for several months. However, in the past week I have lost 3 roosters and 1 hen (when happened to by one of my favorites). The attacks have been in the early morning when it's dark so I'm not sure if it really is the coyotes that are back or some other culprit.

    I have considered electrical fencing, but as I stated before, some of my chickens tend to go outside of my property, so most of the attacks are beyond the fencing (during the day). Anyway, I have purchased some motion sensored lights in hopes that these will scare off the predator(s).. I have also thought about purchasing a motion sensored siren/horn. Just want to know your thoughts on this... Does anyone have any other suggestions?
     
  2. cavemanrich

    cavemanrich Overrun With Chickens

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    Here is what I would do. I am also not in your shoes.
    Fence off an area that you would designate for your chickens. Light gauge fencing to keep your chickens IN.. You can also just modify your goat fencing bottom to keep your chickens in. Get a Hot Wire electric fencing installed on the outside portion of fencing. That should keep out most of the predators you are concerned with. Coyotes, fox, dogs, raccoons. You will still be vulnerable to aerial raptors, but you did not seem to have a problem with those.
    A unit as pictured below should do the job @ about $35
    [​IMG]
    If insufficient , then get a more powerful one. Remember that this electric Hot wire DOES NOT KILL, but only deters predators. They do learn quickly to stay away, with a taste of SPARKY..... [​IMG]
     
  3. rgvchick

    rgvchick Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 9, 2016
    Mercedes, TX
    Thanks for your quick response, caveman. I will look into your suggestion.
     
  4. azygous

    azygous True BYC Addict

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    A very useful component of a hot wire fence is a dab of peanut butter at intervals on the charged wire. This invites the predator to "get the message". It's guaranteed that if a coyote, dog, or bear samples the peanut butter, they will not return.
     
    1 person likes this.
  5. cavemanrich

    cavemanrich Overrun With Chickens

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    @azygous [​IMG]EXCELLENT idea on the peanut butter. I know the feeling when I test a 9 volt battery with my tongue. [​IMG][​IMG]. When a predator tastes 2,700 volts , it must be a SENSATION.
     
  6. rgvchick

    rgvchick Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 9, 2016
    Mercedes, TX
    I will definitely buy some peanut butter too then [​IMG]
     
  7. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Motion sensor lights will do no good...for long, if at all...the horn would be annoying, and preds might get used to that too.

    Electric will do no good either if the birds can get beyond it.
     
  8. rgvchick

    rgvchick Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 9, 2016
    Mercedes, TX
    Thanks for your input, aart.
     
  9. Hallock234

    Hallock234 Just Hatched

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    Mar 5, 2017
    Coyotes will eventually become educated and figure out certain passive deterrence measures (like lights and horns). They are some of the smartest predators out there and are really adept at exploiting vulnerability or weaknesses. Your best bet is to thin them out with hunting or trapping (if they are in season, though some states allow for depredation permits out of season). Culling may not have much of an impact on their numbers in the long term, but it will make them realize there are deadly consequences for straying too close to humans and livestock, and they tend to adjust their habits because of that.

    For a more permanent solution, get a LGD or protective farm dog to keep them away. As well it will probably help if you can keep your chickens confined in a fenced in area....the more they wander, the more opportunities coyotes will see to snatch one up for a meal.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2017
  10. rgvchick

    rgvchick Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 9, 2016
    Mercedes, TX
    Thank you, Hallock234, good info...Hadn't considered how adept the coyotes are. Hunting is not allowed where I live (still within the city limits. But the rest of the suggestions sure could work.
     

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