Cracked beak????? Help

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by dishgal1, Jul 4, 2008.

  1. dishgal1

    dishgal1 New Egg

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    Jul 4, 2008
    I have two chickens whose beaks are split all the way up. What can I do and what is the proper procedure?
     
  2. coffeelady3

    coffeelady3 Froths Milk for Hard Cash

    Jun 26, 2008
    Tacoma, WA
    I could be totally WAY off base on this one, and I would strongly suggest a second opinion before trying this, but what is the general opinion about using super-glue for holding the cracked beak together? I've seen it used in place of sutures for holding skin together, would it work for a beak? (Well, I know it would work. The question is, would it be safe?)
     
  3. tiki244

    tiki244 Flock Mistress

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    WestCentralWisconsin
    Someone had a chicken and she worked at a vets office whom (the vet) fixed parrot beaks, this was a while back, try the search and see if you can come up with it. It is lengthy description and might be helpful. [​IMG]
     
  4. coffeelady3

    coffeelady3 Froths Milk for Hard Cash

    Jun 26, 2008
    Tacoma, WA
    Hey there,

    I was just curious to see how this one turned out.
     
  5. hinkjc

    hinkjc Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Jan 11, 2007
    PA
    I would not recommend super glue, as you risk it getting between the upper and lower beak causing the mouth to be glued shut. I am curious if the OP found a solution.

    Depending on how far up the crack is and how it is positioned, you could trim the beak to the quik and hope it doesn't crack further.

    I would also consider why it is cracking. Is something causing the damage to the beak? Do the birds have faster growth than normal on the beak, causing the splitting - they may need random trimmings? Are they not getting enough calcium in the diet or absorption of calcium to strengthen the beak. Also, are they not trimming their own beak naturally through pecking? Adding a brick or concrete with a treat on it occasionally helps them trim their own beaks properly. Just some things to consider.

    Jody
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2008
  6. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

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    superglue also has a component in it toxic to birds (unlike TISSUE glue) an acrylic or other dental type filler (along with trimming) is often used to prevent further splitting until the beak grows out and the split being trimmed time and time again until replaced with "new" beak... Beaks continue growing so trim carefully and keep trimming (being careful NOT to trim into the "quick" ... if you do this unintentionally then do not use the silver nitrate "blood-stop"stiks as this will be toxic in this type of injury...you will need to cauterize it.) ... be patient and you might be able to resolve it in this way.
    In addition to trauma, bacteria, fungi, viruses and parasites may contribute to weakening the beak. Liver disease may result in abnormal beak growth and small hemorrhages in the beak
    Giving a good general poultry supplement such as aviacharge 2000 will help ensure against sever nutritional deficiency.
    here is some additional info on beaks and even though geared towards cage birds it is equally informative on the beak in general incl. poultry:
    http://www.avianweb.com/brokenbeaks.html

    http://www.birdchannel.com/bird-die...and-health/bird-grooming/beaks-to-trim-or-not
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2008
  7. chickenzoo

    chickenzoo Emu Hugger

    If super glue is toxic, how about faux nail glue? We use it on ourselves, so does it still contain those toxins? Makes you wonder, but faux nail kits come w/fiberglass mesh hat might be able to hold the beak together until it grows out.....(sorry, i use to do nails in another life)....[​IMG]
     
  8. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

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    From what I was able to determine the last time I did an extensive search on that for another member it was also toxic... main thing is to look for a non toxic filler (that wont fall out every two days lol) >>> once filled (after clipping) you could then try those adhesive "nail repair bandages" (adheres on top of beak) but they would have to be replaced often>bout every week maybe two if you are lucky (as would the filler). There is no quick fix in this situation I am afraid (if you find one >nontoxic of course> let me know!)
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2008
  9. chickenzoo

    chickenzoo Emu Hugger

    I know they use some kind of compound for fixing horse hoofs and such, to fill in cracks or rebuild the hoof walls, I'll see what I can find out ......[​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2008
  10. chickenzoo

    chickenzoo Emu Hugger

    Quote:Polyurethanes: eg Vettec Superfast; Adhere; Ibex Fast Set)
    These are almost non-hazardous, although they do produce noxious fumes if a hot shoe is fitted afterwards. The major downside is the heat they produce which can cause problems when used on sensitive parts of the foot. The initial cure time is about 30 seconds, and curing is finished in about 5 - 10 minutes. (“Superfast” may set slightly quicker but tends to be very hard, making it difficult to nail into.


    Jeffers
    Equi-Thane SuperFast Hoof Adhesive
    (Vettec) The future of hoofcare. You can create a custom shoe, add foal extensions or repair small hoofcracks in minutes. Takes 30 seconds to set, then it can be nailed to, rasped, or even cinched like the horses actual hoof.
    Applicator gun (Item V0-L1) needed.

    V0-E1 Equi-Thane SuperFast, 20 cc syringe (no applicator gun needed) $12.95
    V0-EB Equi-Thane SuperFast, 180 cc cartridge $29.95
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2008

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