Cracked corn for the barnyard?

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by chugggles, Aug 2, 2016.

  1. chugggles

    chugggles New Egg

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    Aug 1, 2016
    I'm currently raising chickens, ducks, turkeys, and pigs (I'm super new to pig raising). We have LONG, HARSH winters, and I'm looking for a more cost effective way to keep my animals healthy and happy in the cold months. Im looking into cracked corn. I also will be running a fodder system, and raising mealworms. I'm thinking between those things, they'll get the nutrition they need and if I buy bulk corn, my feed cost will be overall lower. Any thoughts? I also plan to put my pigs on the same system (maybe not as much fodder, since they get more table scraps). Also, I was wondering if there is a shelf life for cracked corn? Right now I am buying store bagged flock and hog food.
     
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe True BYC Addict

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    Corn is usually the main ingredient in most feeds. Adding any more than 10% to the diet wouldn't be the best thing.
    It isn't particularly nutritious. It is in the feed for energy but is low in protein, especially lysine, methionine and tryptophan as well as a variety of vitamins and minerals.

    Fodder is s good idea. IMHO barley is the easiest to use.
     
  3. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    Corn is not an adequate substitute for a complete feed. It adds extra calories, that are needed in the winter, but it's low in nutrients.
     
  4. Lazy J Farms Feed & Hay

    Lazy J Farms Feed & Hay Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feeding only corn will provide inadequate nutrition and will actually end up costing you more in the long run with poorer growth and production from your animals.
     
  5. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe True BYC Addict

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    I wanted to add that there is a shelf life for cracked corn. Once the hull of a seed is broken, it begins to lose nutrients, whatever are there in corn in the first place.
     

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