CrAzY FEET!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by happyhens120, Oct 7, 2011.

  1. happyhens120

    happyhens120 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 8, 2011
    Central PA
    I must have a "weird animal" magnet, because somehow I end up with all kinds of crazy deformities and abnormalities. Like... my dom/orp cross who has webbed feet, my black turken chick who has one normal foot and the toes on the other foot are all curved, not straight. And then my new austrolorp that just hatched today has a toe that seems to be limp. It hangs out under the middle toe and doesn't move.

    Is there something that I can do for these guys? I'm guessing my webbed footer is going to stay that way. He/she is about 4 weeks old and I wouldn't cut the webbing now anyway. I've seen people with "chick shoes" or booties or something that they make for the feet. Is that to correct toe positions?

    I will try to get some pictures up to show you what I mean. They seem to be perfectly healthy chicks with the exception of their feet. I'm just hoping that this won't cause trouble later down the road...
     
  2. Uniontown Poultry

    Uniontown Poultry Chillin' With My Peeps

    Hiya! If your chick's toes are crooked or not spaced properly, chick shoes may fix that. Depending on the size of the bird & its toes & the nature of the deformity, it can be as easy as making chick shoes from the adhesive parts of a fabric band-aid, putting the one part adhesive-side-up, putting the chick foot squarely on the band-aid part (you can leave the back toe hanging out), and placing the other band-aid part on the top of the foot, pressing gently between the toes to make sure they're securely fixed between the adhesive band-aid parts.

    If it's an older chick with deformed toes, you may need to upgrade the bottom piece of the shoe to cardboard, and maybe use athletic tape (fabric, ribbed like gosgrain ribbon) to affix everything in place.

    The webbed toes I think you are stuck with - but how interesting! I'd love to see a photo of that.

    Hope this helps! [​IMG]
     
  3. happyhens120

    happyhens120 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ok. I did the band-aid trick. It's hilarious to watch them walk after putting them on! How long should it stay there? I'm assuming that it will need to be changed every so often so it doesn't get gross? I'll get some photos and post shortly.
     
  4. happyhens120

    happyhens120 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 8, 2011
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    I was able to get some photos to add... some of them aren't the greatest. I just couldn't get them to hold still very long!

    This is the little Austrolorp that hatched today. After I looked closer, I saw that both side toes are limp. It doesn't have much control over where they are, and they are usually stuck under the big toe, making it really hard for him to get around. This is the one that I'm most worried about since it doesn't have much mobility with a bum foot.
    [​IMG]

    This one has the curved toes. It's a turken, about a week old. It gets around pretty well despite the crazy toes!
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    And just for the fun of it, the webbed footed dom/buff orp cross. Gets around great. No complaints about the webbing from this little guy/gal. About 4 weeks old here.
    [​IMG]
     
  5. Uniontown Poultry

    Uniontown Poultry Chillin' With My Peeps

    The weebed toes are really strange!

    As for the others, the turken doesn't look to be too old if you want to try and uncurl those toes, but the band-aid trick won't do it. You'd need cardboard, or a popsicle stick, or guitar pick, or something like that that you could tape his little foot to, with the toes taped in the right position, and I'd leave it for a week (check the fit of the shoe and to see if it's getting gross & needs retaped during that week). The muscles learn quickly, which is why I'm thinking about a week.

    Your new hatchling is adorable! It is possible that his nerves/muscles aren't 100% developed on those outer toes, which is why they are limp. This may remedy itself as he grows & he may end up having control over those toes after all. Keeping the toes in the correct position may help this to happen. And even if the toes stay limp forever, if the chick's skin and joints form as though the toes were in the correct position, the full-grown joints and fully-formed foot won't allow the toes to flop over under the first toe. Right now, he's young and rubbery. If you can keep the toes in the correct position until he's mostly grown (by doing the bandaid-shoes when he's young), then the problem won't recur.

    As to how long to leave the band-aid shoe on, I'd play it by ear. If the chick masters walking with his toes in correct position in a day or so, then your work is done - remove the band-aid. The goal is to get him walking like the rest of his buddies, and I would not think it should take more than a week at his age. Take the shoe off every day or so to observe his walking & see if it has to go back on. They are pretty durable, but you do want to check his progress. Best of luck!![​IMG]
     
  6. bock

    bock Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Northern CA
    I'm not much help, but about two years ago we had a pigeon hatch out and all the toes on his right foot were webbed. We just cut the skin when he was all feathered out. Couldn't even tell the difference after that. [​IMG] I thought it was pretty interesting.
     
  7. happyhens120

    happyhens120 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 8, 2011
    Central PA
    Thanks for all the great info and your help! I'm testing the new one to see if the bandaid worked. He seems to be getting better but he's still wobbly.
    I'll keep you posted! [​IMG]
     
  8. HenniPenni

    HenniPenni Out Of The Brooder

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    May 19, 2011
    Roaring River, NC

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