Cream Legbar x Cuckoo Marans

HensOnOxney

In the Brooder
Nov 12, 2018
5
2
14
UK
I have a couple of cuckoo Marans hens with my CL cockerel. Mostly the offspring come out dark barred (female) or light barred (Male) presumably because the female inherits one barring gene and the Male two ‍♀️
Occasionally (about 10-20% of females) I get what looks like a gold Legbar (lacking the gold inhibiting ig gene of the CL??) Please could someone explain to me how these variabilities occur? Thanks in advance
 

GaryDean26

Chicken Czar
9 Years
Dec 22, 2011
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McAlester, OK
My Coop
My Coop
I have a couple of cuckoo Marans hens with my CL cockerel. Mostly the offspring come out dark barred (female) or light barred (Male) presumably because the female inherits one barring gene and the Male two ‍♀️
Occasionally (about 10-20% of females) I get what looks like a gold Legbar (lacking the gold inhibiting ig gene of the CL??) Please could someone explain to me how these variabilities occur? Thanks in advance

Your Cuckoo Marans are not as pure as your think they are. The 10-20% gold Legbar looking chicks are from a Cuckoo Marans Hen that is carrying a recessive color pattern. The Cuckoo Marans should carry two copies of the "Extended Black" [E] primary color pattern. If they are pure for the [E] gene they only will be able to pass on the [E] color pattern with produces a black chick and is dominant to all other color patterns in chickens. What you have is one or more hens that is only carrying on [E] gene and one of the other color patterns (wheaten [eWh] that produces yellow chicks, Wild type [e+] that produces chipmunk striped chicks, Partridge [eb] that produced chicks with a darker colored head than the rest of the body, etc.) A hen with a recessive gene will pass the [E] to 50% of her offspring and they will be black and a recessive to 50% of the offspring and they will look like gold legbars.

As far as the gold goes, it would be expected that all the offspring would be gold (and not cream). It is not likely for any Cuckoo Marans to carry the cream gene. With our a cream gene from both sides of the pairing the chicks will come out gold. Cream is recessive and only shows in the plumage when the bird has two copies of the gene.

You are correct with the pullets being darker from one barring gene and the cockerels light from two barring genes.
 
Last edited:

HensOnOxney

In the Brooder
Nov 12, 2018
5
2
14
UK
Your Cuckoo Marans are not as pure as your think they are. The 10-20% gold Legbar looking chicks are from a Legbar Hen that is carrying a recessive color pattern. The Cuckoo Marans should carry two coppies of the "Extended Black" [E] primary color parttern. If they are pure for the [E] gene they only will be able to pass on the [E] color pattern with produces a black chick and is dominant to all other color patterns in chickens. What you have is one or more hens that is only carrying on [E] gene and one of the other color patterns (wheaten [eWh] that produces yellow chicks, Wild type [e+] that produces chipmonk striped chicks, Partridge [eb] that produced chicks with a darker colored head than the rest of the body, etc.) A hen with a recessive gene will pass the [E] to 50% of her offspring and they will be black and a recessive to 50% of the offspring and they will look like gold legbars.

As far as the gold goes, it would be expected that all the offspring would be gold (and not cream). It is not likely for any Cuckoo Marans to carry the cream gene. With our a cream gene from both sides of the pairing the chicks will come out gold. Cream is recessive and only shows in the plumage when the bird has two copies of the gene.

You are correct with the pullets being darker from one barring gene and the cockerels light from two barring genes.

That’s amazing, thanks so much for the response! Fascinating stuff this genetics, if incredibly complicated! :)
 

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