Crop bra experiences?

cate1124

Songster
9 Years
Jul 3, 2011
131
193
177
I'm treating my buff orpington for what seems to be slowing/sour crop. One of her presenting symptoms was an odd sort of "S' shaped motion with her head and neck, as if she was trying to clear something from her gullet. If you've had crop issues with a bird, you know what I'm talking about. Anyway, I started her on vaginal cream yesterday and that motion seemed to diminish. Today I'm also using a crop bra, and it's triggered the return of the motion. She does not like the bra, but is tolerating it. My question is whether the return of the "clearing" motion is to be expected as the bra puts pressure on the crop to help it drain, and will recede as the presumed yeast infection resolves and the crop empties normally? Or, whether I may be doing harm -- besides making her uncomfortable for a couple days -- by using the bra? Those of you who have used these (I have the storebought "Birdy Bra"): What was your experience? Did it immediately help? Seem to make things worse initially, but then help? Not help at all, even after being on a few days?
 

coach723

Free Ranging
6 Years
Feb 12, 2015
6,551
10,947
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North Florida
It very much depends on what is causing the crop issue. Sometimes the slowing crop is a sign of something going on farther down the digestive tract and the crop is just a symptom. If that is the case then a crop bra may or may not help. Birds with reproductive problems like cancer, or infection will often present with a slowed crop due to the pressure on their abdomens. Reproductive problems have been my biggest cause of slow crops. I have had slow crops also from carrying a load of internal parasites and one that was an impacted gizzard. If it is purely a crop problem, like pendulous crop, then the bra may be more of a help. I would expect that if it's helping you would see some improvement and some emptying of the crop within 24 hours, but I have had it take longer to empty completely. Again, it really depends on what is actually going on in there. These are very good articles on crop problems in general and how to try to narrow it down:
https://www.backyardchickens.com/ar...w-to-know-which-one-youre-dealing-with.73607/
https://www.backyardchickens.com/ar...ntion-and-treatments-of-crop-disorders.67194/
 

cate1124

Songster
9 Years
Jul 3, 2011
131
193
177
It very much depends on what is causing the crop issue. Sometimes the slowing crop is a sign of something going on farther down the digestive tract and the crop is just a symptom. If that is the case then a crop bra may or may not help. Birds with reproductive problems like cancer, or infection will often present with a slowed crop due to the pressure on their abdomens. Reproductive problems have been my biggest cause of slow crops. I have had slow crops also from carrying a load of internal parasites and one that was an impacted gizzard. If it is purely a crop problem, like pendulous crop, then the bra may be more of a help. I would expect that if it's helping you would see some improvement and some emptying of the crop within 24 hours, but I have had it take longer to empty completely. Again, it really depends on what is actually going on in there. These are very good articles on crop problems in general and how to try to narrow it down:
https://www.backyardchickens.com/ar...w-to-know-which-one-youre-dealing-with.73607/
https://www.backyardchickens.com/ar...ntion-and-treatments-of-crop-disorders.67194/
Thanks. I've read the threads. I get that my hen's problem -- she just turned 6 - may be farther downstream, in which case, it's probably curtains. I very much doubt cocci or parasites, and she is not fully impacted. Thus the treatment for slow/souring crop. I'm m ostly trying to make sure I won't do harm with the bra -- impede the crop, rather than aid it, in emptying.
 

coach723

Free Ranging
6 Years
Feb 12, 2015
6,551
10,947
611
North Florida
As long as she can breathe, and circulation is not cut off, it should be ok. Some of them accept them after a period of adjustment, some have a really hard time getting used to them. I've had them walk backwards, in circles, fall over on their backs, and high step before getting used to them. So I always supervise, and on some occasions crate them, so that they don't get attacked, or manage to hurt themselves trying to get rid of the thing.
 

cate1124

Songster
9 Years
Jul 3, 2011
131
193
177
As long as she can breathe, and circulation is not cut off, it should be ok. Some of them accept them after a period of adjustment, some have a really hard time getting used to them. I've had them walk backwards, in circles, fall over on their backs, and high step before getting used to them. So I always supervise, and on some occasions crate them, so that they don't get attacked, or manage to hurt themselves trying to get rid of the thing.
I hear you. The hen I bought this for was so freaked out I could not bear to persist; I eventually had her euthanized after vet visits, medication and repeated vet vomiting did not get her crop working again. I'm happy to say my Orpington, Tess, seems to be adjusting well as the day goes on. It is not keeping her from eating, and she is currently on the nest. And I had a great moment this morning when I was steeling myself to stuff the vaginal cream in her beak, and she reached over and ate it off my finger. Good chicken. Good, good chicken.
 

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