Crop Surgery tonight- veteran support and advice much apreciated

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Funkaknits, Mar 4, 2011.

  1. Funkaknits

    Funkaknits Chirping

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    Jul 28, 2010
    Gainesville, FL
    My year old RIR, Billie Jean has had crop issues for a little over a month now.
    I've had her in her own crate outside during the day (no access to any dirt etc- only the much and water I've provided. At night I bring her in and she sleeps in a box with some water.

    At first I was doing apple cider vinegar in her water & mushy food, then noticed her crop getting even more rotten. I had been giving her plain probiotic yogurt and it just seemed to be rotting in her crop until I helped her vomit it out by holding her forward. I've tried crop massage after oil in her food, baking soda in her food and water. Last Friday I found a feed store that sold antibiotics and I've been adding them to her water. I feel as if I have truly tried everything.

    Yesterday I noticed a tremendous amount (compared to what it has been) of what I thought was poop in her crate. Today, I started really watching her and sure enough, it's not poop. Her food is going in her crop and then shes vomiting it out.

    Finally, I have convinced my husband to assist me in doing the crop surgery. I have a feeling she might be too far gone but I feel like I have to try.
    Poor girl- she is ravenous, of course! It seems like nothing is getting through to her stomach.
    Here is the confusing part to me- when her crop is empty, it really feels empty. Could there be a blockage I just can't feel externally?

    I am going to head out soon and pick up some betadine and some gloves. I planned to close her crop by rolling it inwards on a thin line of superglue and then the same with her outer skin.

    From others' experience, is it better to make the incision side to side or up and down? And how thick can I expect the skin to be? How thick is the crop tissue?
    From reading this, do you think my hen's system is starting to shut down and the crop surgery is pointless?
     
  2. terrilhb

    terrilhb Songster

    Dec 11, 2010
    Georgia
    [​IMG] from Ga. Sorry your 1st post is this. I do not know anything about this but sending good vibes and prayers. [​IMG] [​IMG] I am sure someone will answer you soon. Good luck.
     
  3. Funkaknits

    Funkaknits Chirping

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    Jul 28, 2010
    Gainesville, FL
    Thanks for the support [​IMG]
    I read a LOT on here but have two small children so it's unusual for me to find the time to post.
     
  4. Monk422

    Monk422 In the Brooder

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    Jan 6, 2011
    Manteca, Ca
    Did you read on this page about the family that just did this procedure? The video she provided was on page 3 of her thread. Good luck and keep us posted.
     
  5. Funkaknits

    Funkaknits Chirping

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    Jul 28, 2010
    Gainesville, FL
    I didn't but I'm going to search for it right now. I am finding some really great videos on youtube.
     
  6. purpletree23

    purpletree23 Songster

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    May 15, 2009
    The video is right here in BYC under Emergencies/Diseases/Cures The title is Impacted Crop Baseball Size Video is Ready Please watch it before attempting the surgery. The incision is best going up and down. Close the crop and the skin as 2 layers and not one. When you are ready to close push the edges of the crop together(DO NOT ROLL THE EDGES JUST PUSH TOGETHER SO IT LOOKS LIKE YOU DID BEFORE YOU CUT HER) , dry with a clean rag and apply the glue in a small amount. Wipe any excess away with a Q-tip. Let dry. Blow on it if you have to. Keep holding for at least 40 seconds. THEN close the skin. Make sure the skin and the crop do not stick together.

    A chickens skin is very thin. To open this layer you will use very little pressure. Start light and then go a little firmer. The crop is thicker because it is a muscle. Again start light and go firmer. You will need a long pair or blunt tweezers to reach into the base of her crop to get the clog out. Also a turkey baster to flush the crop out. Put warm water into her crop and use the baster to suck all the junk back out.

    If you are up to it do it tonight. If not ( I don't mince words) humanly put her down. Starvation is unacceptable.
     

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