Crossing an PB Ameraucana Roo on different hens - Egg colors

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by plumcreek, Mar 7, 2012.

  1. plumcreek

    plumcreek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Does anyone know of a site that shows the results they got when they crossed a PB Ameraucana roo on different pure bred hens? I am interested in seeing what the Mother's egg looked like and then seeing what the resulting offspring's eggs looked like when they matured and added the blue gene. Has anyone seen anything like this?

    Thanks!
     
  2. AquaEyes

    AquaEyes Chillin' With My Peeps

    The mothers' eggs won't look any different than they always do.
     
  3. v.cyr

    v.cyr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I get the impression the OP is aware of that....they are askinwhat the offspring's eggs would look like in comparison to the mother's...
     
  4. plumcreek

    plumcreek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Exactly, having never met them I don't know what they "always look like" in order to comapre them with the offsprings eggs. I would really like to see what happens to different egg colors when the blue gene is added in other words. I would like to see the mother's egg and then the offspring's egg and see now it turned out.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2012
  5. Kate McKae

    Kate McKae Out Of The Brooder

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    I'm fascinated with egg color but I've found very little written or for that matter listed on the Internet. I like the idea of having the comparison eggs would be a great idea but I haven't seen anything like that. It would be tough though I have six hens of the same olive egger breeding and they all lay distinctly different eggs from mint and chip to dark golden chocolate. So you could concievably have a this plus this sometimes equals this but then again might yield this over here... My experience so far is that's it's very complicated, probably why there's so very little information. I will tell you I have found that olive egger to a white egger takes you back to ameraucana blue green. White egger to a ameraucana blue green so far has taken me to ice blue. Ameraucana to light tan varieties of sage. The most interesting of course ameraucana to maran but so far those colors are all over the map for me. I can post pics of what I have so far if it will help. Or maybe narrow it down to what you had in mind. But from what I've conjectured so far white seems to erase brown and blue has so far been dominent over white in shell color. But I'm not an expert just a curious chicken enthusiast. :)
     
  6. Illia

    Illia Crazy for Colors

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    This site right here helps with that. You just gotta search around. I've got some Ameraucana x Polish, Marans, and even Araucana x New Hampshire egg photos scattered around the forum. Got a couple other members' photos around here too who have pullets they hatched/bought from me.
     
  7. Kate McKae

    Kate McKae Out Of The Brooder

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    oh for certain you have the coolest eggs colors! I would love to talk egg color with you. That pic you have posted is awesome. Oh by the way I was going to email you I'm still interested in buff ams when you have some:)
     
  8. Illia

    Illia Crazy for Colors

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    Not right now sadly. Had to cull my main rooster a while back, so right now I just have a pure hen, a wheatenxbuff, and a couple accidental crosses running around.
     
  9. tadkerson

    tadkerson Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Because egg color is so variable you can only give a general idea of color. The depth of color depends on the breed or even sometimes the individual bird.

    purebred for blue egg allele x purebred for white egg allele = a light blue egg to an almost white egg

    purebred for blue egg genes x a brown egg layer= green eggs the depth of the green is dependent upon the amount of brown pigment that is added to the egg.

    Tim
     
  10. plumcreek

    plumcreek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The reason I am looking is because it is variable. If someone is dealing with prebred birds with eggs that have become uniform and predictable then it should be possible to predict the egg colors when crossed to a certain extent.

    I searched around here but haven't found any before/afters.
     

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