Crossing easter eggers with??? Still want green/blue eggs

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Brom014, Mar 10, 2014.

  1. Brom014

    Brom014 New Egg

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    Here is my question, it may or may not be a simple one. What breed of chicken can I cross a easter egger, blue/green layer and still continue to get blue/green type
    Eggs? For example an easter egger/RIR cross or an easter egger/leghorn cross... ??? Has any one had experience or luck with this? Let me know, thanks everyone.
     
  2. Spangled

    Spangled Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Of the three that I've hatched combining green egg layers and Black Copper Marans, I've had 2 olive colored layers and one dark brown layer. All had pea combs.

    Just about any chicken crossed with a green egg layer that is "pure" for green eggs will produce another green egg layer. If not "pure," then it's about half the time--at least that's how I understand it. There's no way to look at the green egg layer and know if she's "pure" or not.

    Here's a page at BYC that has a good explanation:

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/429641/are-green-egg-genes-dominant
     
  3. ChickenWisperer

    ChickenWisperer Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 30, 2008
    KY
    ETA: Jeez, I need to pay more attention when I'm making posts! Sorry about that, y'all. I was only paying attention from the pic and didn't realize it was the wrong one.

    The only way you're guaranteed to get stock that will lay blue or green eggs is to cross them back to Ameraucana, Araucana, or Cream Legbar.

    Otherwise? You're literally flying blind on it. Since EE's are crosses or ambiguous stock at best, you don't know whether they're carrying one or two copies of the blue egg gene - and two copies is rare from my experience.

    So, a safe assumption is that your Easter Eggers are carry only one copy of the blue egg gene (which is dominant) like most EE's you'll encounter. Choosing to breed to any breed with normal color eggs (white shelled), you'll get this, where B is for blue shells and w for white - (since I can't find the correct punnet square pic, I'll have to make due with something textual)

    B W
    w Bw ww
    w Bw ww


    The only way to guarantee colored laying stock, like I said, is cross directly from pure, blue-egger stock or EE's which you know for certain carry two copies of the blue egg gene.
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2014
  4. Spangled

    Spangled Chillin' With My Peeps

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    How does that Punnett square work??? Why isn't that bottom left square also a Bw? I don't get your diagram at all. It's really confusing. Makes me scratch my head and squint, since you sound very authoritative.

    ***Original post by Chicken Whisperer state 25% (as seen above) which is incorrect. Left in for the sake of thread history. 50% is true amount as stated by dheltzel below.***
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2014
  5. dheltzel

    dheltzel Overrun With Chickens

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    You're right, the bottom left square is also Bw (bad choice of letters, should be Bb x bb(.

    In any cross involving a completely dominant gene, if either parent shows the phenotype of that gene, at least 50% of the offspring will also.

    Also, most hatchery EE's are homozygous for blue, otherwise they won't breed true for the colored eggs, which is what they are sold for. Not a guarantee, but generally crossing an EE with anything results in all blue/green eggs in the F1.
     
  6. Spangled

    Spangled Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Last edited: Mar 11, 2014
  7. ChickenWisperer

    ChickenWisperer Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 30, 2008
    KY
    It is - I didn't realize I'd chosen the flawed pic when I uploaded. Sorry! Goes to say you should check what you put down twice, and I agree, bad mistake on my part that's very confusing at best. I removed the file from my post but it's still in one of your replies. I don't know if that'll still show up in search results but I'm guessing so.
     
  8. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    If you have a blue layer and breed to white, you should get a light blue layer. Green to white gives light green.

    Blue to brown usually gives green.

    Green to brown can give green or brown. Sometimes the green isn't very pretty, either. I have some green/brown mixes who lay a muddy green egg that's really not very attractive.
     
  9. Spangled

    Spangled Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Brom014, another thing that you've probably already caught on to is that in the second generation (the babies from your first batch), you won't know if the cockerels (male chicks) are necessarily going to make green egg laying chicks. The cockerels to save and breed from, if you want to keep making more green egg layers in the future, are the ones with the pea combs. The green egg gene usually gets passed on with the pea comb gene; I've heard 97% of the time or something like that, but don't quote me. And then, of course, only hatch the green eggs.

    **I call them green eggs because they never look blue to me. I don't really care about using the correct genetics term ... at least not today. :)
     
  10. audreydg

    audreydg New Egg

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    I have a year and 1/2 old easter egger (thought she was an ameracauna when i bought her) who lays pale green eggs. yesterday, she laid a robins egg blue egg (it could have been one of the other ameracaunas who lay white/pinkish eggs but i don't think so). today, green again. i don't think anyone sneaked in and deposited the blue egg. any explanation?
     

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