Cull 3 week old chicks-MG?

MTchicks16

Chirping
May 19, 2020
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So, I’m thinking I need to cull 6 three week old chicks. 4 Easter Eggers and 2 pure blue Ameraucana’s.
Last week I noticed a few of the chicks sneezing and wheezing. I separated them, but now noticed that the rest of the chicks are doing the same. None are gasping for air, and they are all eating/drinking/pooping just fine. They all have lots of energy, not lethargic at all. I’m worried about the possibility of them having MG.

I wanted to breed the Ameraucana’s but now that’s not going to happen. I’m currently incubating some Ameraucana’s and Cream Legbar’s and need to figure out what to do with these 6 chicks before the new ones hatch.

I need advice on how to cull these 6 chicks. Thinking about using the baking soda method, but thinking it may be easier to just use scissors?

Also, how do I sanitize to prevent the new chicks I’m hatching from getting MG?

Thanks!
 

MTchicks16

Chirping
May 19, 2020
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I should add that these chicks were shipped to me from a (I thought) reputable breeder. I have 4 other chickens in a coop that have never been sick. These chicks are inside my house in a brooder.
 

NatJ

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Mar 20, 2017
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I need advice on how to cull these 6 chicks. Thinking about using the baking soda method, but thinking it may be easier to just use scissors?

Scissors might work.

I've sometimes done bantams at 4-5 weeks old, so probably similar size.

Because I use a hatchet or machete to chop the heads off big chickens, that's what I used on little ones too. A meat cleaver should also work.

With little birds, you don't have to chop as hard as with big ones, but the hand holding the chicken is much closer to the blade--do be careful not to cut yourself!

I hold big birds by the feet and wingtips, little ones with a hand around the lower half of the body. Either way, I want them calm, then I lay the neck on the chopping block. One quick chop and that one's done.
 

Eggcessive

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Why not send in a couple of the chicks to your state vet for a necropsy if you cull them? Or get some testing done through the state vet, a company called Zoologix who will send swabs in the mail, or have a local vet do some cultures? How long have you had the chicks? Has there been any contact with equipment or your other chickens? Chicks can sneeze and have respiratory issues from environmental stimuli, mold in wet bedding, and from dust in feed ir bedding. There are at least 5 respiratory diseases, and testing would tell you if they are sick or not. Here is a list of state vets and another for a testing facility in TX:
https://www.metzerfarms.com/PoultryLabs.cfm

http://www.zoologix.com/avian/Datasheets/PoultryRespiratoryPanel.htm
 

MTchicks16

Chirping
May 19, 2020
56
89
66
Why not send in a couple of the chicks to your state vet for a necropsy if you cull them? Or get some testing done through the state vet, a company called Zoologix who will send swabs in the mail, or have a local vet do some cultures? How long have you had the chicks? Has there been any contact with equipment or your other chickens? Chicks can sneeze and have respiratory issues from environmental stimuli, mold in wet bedding, and from dust in feed ir bedding. There are at least 5 respiratory diseases, and testing would tell you if they are sick or not. Here is a list of state vets and another for a testing facility in TX:
https://www.metzerfarms.com/PoultryLabs.cfm

http://www.zoologix.com/avian/Datasheets/PoultryRespiratoryPanel.htm

I considered that they might he having a reaction to me cleaning an dusting in the room that they are in. I kinda suspected something was wrong with them when I first got them.
Scissors might work.

I've sometimes done bantams at 4-5 weeks old, so probably similar size.

Because I use a hatchet or machete to chop the heads off big chickens, that's what I used on little ones too. A meat cleaver should also work.

With little birds, you don't have to chop as hard as with big ones, but the hand holding the chicken is much closer to the blade--do be careful not to cut yourself!

I hold big birds by the feet and wingtips, little ones with a hand around the lower half of the body. Either way, I want them calm, then I lay the neck on the chopping block. One quick chop and that one's done.

Thank you, I think I’ll try the sharp scissors.
 

MTchicks16

Chirping
May 19, 2020
56
89
66
Why not send in a couple of the chicks to your state vet for a necropsy if you cull them? Or get some testing done through the state vet, a company called Zoologix who will send swabs in the mail, or have a local vet do some cultures? How long have you had the chicks? Has there been any contact with equipment or your other chickens? Chicks can sneeze and have respiratory issues from environmental stimuli, mold in wet bedding, and from dust in feed ir bedding. There are at least 5 respiratory diseases, and testing would tell you if they are sick or not. Here is a list of state vets and another for a testing facility in TX:
https://www.metzerfarms.com/PoultryLabs.cfm

http://www.zoologix.com/avian/Datasheets/PoultryRespiratoryPanel.htm

At first I thought they might have had a reaction to me dusting or cleaning the room that they are in, but it’s been going on for almost a week now and they seem to be getting worse. A few seem like they are having trouble breathing.
 

MTchicks16

Chirping
May 19, 2020
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89
66
I never know who has what tool (or is comfortable using it!) Sounds like that should work for you :)

How do I go about sanitizing the brooder for the new batch of chicks? Do I chuck all my brooder equipment and start fresh, or is there a way to effectively get rid of the virus/bacteria?
 

NatJ

Free Ranging
Mar 20, 2017
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How do I go about sanitizing the brooder for the new batch of chicks? Do I chuck all my brooder equipment and start fresh, or is there a way to effectively get rid of the virus/bacteria?

It depends partly on what disease is involved, which we (and you) do not know.

Sanitizing is not my strong point, but I would certainly throw away anything disposable, and probably anything that is really easy and cheap to replace.

For metal/plastic/glass items, washing with disinfectant probably makes sense. Maybe sit things in the sun to dry. (Sunlight kills some kinds of germs. I wouldn't trust it instead of disinfectant, but sunlight in addition might help and shouldn't hurt.)

I don't think there is any way to sanitize most bedding materials. Objects made of wood may also be impossible to sanitize.
 

MTchicks16

Chirping
May 19, 2020
56
89
66
It depends partly on what disease is involved, which we (and you) do not know.

Sanitizing is not my strong point, but I would certainly throw away anything disposable, and probably anything that is really easy and cheap to replace.

For metal/plastic/glass items, washing with disinfectant probably makes sense. Maybe sit things in the sun to dry. (Sunlight kills some kinds of germs. I wouldn't trust it instead of disinfectant, but sunlight in addition might help and shouldn't hurt.)

I don't think there is any way to sanitize most bedding materials. Objects made of wood may also be impossible to sanitize.

Ok thanks. I’ll try
 

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