Culling Regrets

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by Redcatcher, Nov 14, 2010.

  1. Redcatcher

    Redcatcher Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 7, 2010
    At My Desk!
    I know I am getting soft in my old age but I just culled a huge, magnificent blue partridge EE roo and now regret it. He was seven years old though and lived a good life. He had been the dominant roo of the flock for most of his life and then his sons ganged up on him to the point where he could not even go near his own chicken house. Even the lowest ranking chickens in the flock would chase him away. He started hanging around the yard and when it rained, he would hang around on the porch. I got tired of having to clean up the mess. He was gentle and friendly and wanted to be wherever people were. Looking back, I could have built him his own pen. I put an ad up on Craigslist for two weeks, trying to rehome him, first in the pet category and then in the Home and Garden. Free of course. Not a single taker. Anyway, I really miss him now but what is done is done. Rest in Peace, buddy.
     
  2. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    My inclination would have been for me to gang up on his sons and put their carcasses in the freezer, but we do what we have to do. You gave him a good life and it was just his time to go.
     
  3. Redcatcher

    Redcatcher Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 7, 2010
    At My Desk!
    Quote:I had thought about doing that but at that point I do not think it would have mattered. All of them were after him. He refused to fight or even defend himself. He was not at all ill. It just seemed that he turned had turned into this huge wuss even though he could have still put up a hell of a fight. He ran from everything, screaming the whole way.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2010
  4. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    When a dominant rooster is "dethroned" it actually causes a decrease in testosterone production resulting in wussy behavior. Removing the challengers and putting him in a safe place might have resulted in an increase in testosterone levels, but his age was against him. (Don't ask me how I know.[​IMG])
     
  5. Redcatcher

    Redcatcher Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 7, 2010
    At My Desk!
    In good health but feathers shredded from taking a beating from everyone. He found peace up near the house and around the garden.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    It's possible that he stopped trying to maintain his social status because he was sick, or didn't feel good. You may have saved him some pain.
     
  7. calicokat

    calicokat Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 2, 2009
    azalia, indiana
    It's always hard when it's a favorite. At least he's happy and freeranging in chickie heaven [​IMG]
     
  8. Dixiedoodle

    Dixiedoodle Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 14, 2007
    I have found that culling (for what ever reason) is the hardest chore on the entire farm!! Sorry for your regrets! Hopefully, one of his sons will be a great rooster for you...
     
  9. Omniskies

    Omniskies Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You culled him for a reason. After looking at his situation and what was happening with him, you carefully considered what should be done. And after that long internal debate, you made a decision.

    It's easy to forget what made you do this in the first place and regret doing it. It's extremely easy to look at the past and say "What if?" But when it comes to culling, we all think long and hard and know what we are doing when we make our final decision. After it is done don't wonder - if you know your birds then it is safe to say that you made the right decision.
     
  10. kathyinmo

    kathyinmo Nothing In Moderation

    Awwwww, I am sorry you are feeling sad. [​IMG] I understand what you are saying, too. Currently I have one roo that I hatched from 12 eggs. He is very special, and a giant (as well as a Jersey Giant). I soooooo much want progeny from him, but he is like you described, exactly. He takes refuge at the house, stays near us, and is picked on by the rest of the flock. I just don't know what to do. He is still young, but it appears he is never gonna fit in. I sure hope I do not have to resort to culling.

    I am sorry for your sadness. You did the right thing. Really, you did.
     

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