Curious about 'game bird' laying habits and growth patterns

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Dipsy Doodle Doo, Sep 11, 2008.

  1. Hi!
    I have a trio of birds here that are 'American Game (I forgot what xactly, but Aseel/Asil x is part of the mix )', (against my better judgement) --- because they weren't thriving in their previous habitat.

    I was told they shouldn't be expected to lay again til late winter/spring.
    Both hens are laying after just 2 weeks of being here.

    The point was made (from the old-timers) that the chicks from eggs laid now will never be as 'robust' as 'spring chicks'.
    They even pointed out smaller hens that were from 'fall-raised chicks'.

    Would that that apply to hand-raised chicks or just hen-raised ranging chicks? Or is it some genetic-something?

    Thanks,
    [​IMG]
    Lisa
     
  2. fowlafoot

    fowlafoot Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have to ask why it's against your better judgement? I ask as someone who has had the breed for years and adores them. They are hardy, athletic, disease resistant, predator resistant, excellent free rangers and mothers... most of mine also make excellent fathers. BTW you probably have a variety called roundhead if they have asil in them.

    As for the chicks, no it's not genetic but it is based on survival. Most of the stress fall hatched chicks are under is weather related. Their bodies are pushing them to mature and feather fast enough that they won't freeze come winter. They also respond badly to the lessening sunlight. If you raise them by hand they'll have less stress. While they will be smaller it's a nurture not a nature thing so they can still be good broodstock. I wish you the best luck with them!

    edited for spelling errors [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2008
  3. floridachickenman

    floridachickenman Out Of The Brooder

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    hey fowlafoot, if u raise the babies in a brooder with a light, will they still b smaller? i have 4 game hens (kelsoxhatch and roundhead x kelso/hatch) hoping to get a wildcat blue as a roo or maybe a blue from prariechicken later. since i recently dicovered american games, i am truly impressed with them, i wish i had many more
     
  4. LocoPollo

    LocoPollo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Where can I find more info on these birds? I have never heard of them. I have some Old English, and the ones you are talking about sound interesting.
     
  5. fowlafoot

    fowlafoot Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Brooder with a light is the best way to raise fall chicks, even if the hens hatch this late I'll give them a light as it gets colder. In my experience it seems to be the sunlight more than anything that makes them smaller so I'd give them as much access to sun as you can and it won't be dramatic. I've never had wildcat blues but I do know that I've always been impressed with Prariechiken's birds [​IMG]

    There are many kinds of American Games, they all have slightly different histories... you can do a google book search for History of Game Strains and it will let you read exerpts from many of the most successful breeders. The best online sources can't be mentioned here as they are other forums but feel free to e-mail me and I will send you the links to a few great places to find birds, ask questions etc on the game breeds.
     
  6. [​IMG] Just personal preference, really.
    My brothers have raised them for as long as I can remember. I always thought it rather unfair that the cocks have brilliant plumage and the hens (in my experience) are 'just brown-ish'.
    I think this cock is pumpkin roundhead or the hens are pumpkin roundhead and the cock is something else --- I don't remember.
    He won trophy's for something (???).

    It's good to know I can get around the non-robust-late-season chicks by hand-raising them under lights, thanks!

    The owner of the birds will be collecting the chicks every 6 or 8 weeks as I hatch them (that is the plan, I don't want to keep them here any longer than that).

    Thanks,
    [​IMG]
    Lisa
     
  7. prariechiken

    prariechiken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Pumpkin Hulseys or something like that....sounds like a fun endeaver there, getting to bring up all those biddies....[​IMG]
     
  8. [​IMG] Fun for me, yes --- I like hatching eggs and tending chicks.
    I had to call and ask again just what they are. The hens are Asil x Harold Brown Hatch and the cock is Blue Face Hatch (*rolls eyes* it might as well be greek).

    Lisa
     
  9. prariechiken

    prariechiken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nice.... Hatch refers to strains "supposedly" traced back to Sandy Hatch a prominant historical breeder. Characteristically they are dark legged fowl, usually green to willow colored legged black breasted reds. Harold Brown is a more recent historical breeder who created his own "hatch" family that rose to prominence. The Blufaces are straight combed, Harold Brown should be pea combed...and the asil...thats a "monkey bird", Oriental gamefowl are sometimes referred to as this........enough with the Greek lessons...they ought to be some nice little chickies.... [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
  10. Oh my, PrairieChicken! Are you sure you don't live in GA and your initials are JGL? That is nearly word-for-word the explanation I got yesterday morning on the phone.
    I guess all that is familiar to folks that raise American Gamebirds. I've been hearing it for years, but I have an uncanny ability to 'tune it out'.
    Suddenly, it's pertinent.
    Thanks!
    [​IMG]
    Lisa
     

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