Curly toes and riboflavin deficiency

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by chickenannie, Jul 26, 2008.

  1. chickenannie

    chickenannie Chillin' With My Peeps

    3,156
    21
    231
    Nov 19, 2007
    Pennsylvania
    I just read an article on pastured chickens that said that if curly toes affect more than 5% of your flock and affects both feet, the problem is a riboflavin deficiency. Treatment is adding riboflavin, feeding liver or brewer's yeast to increase B vitamins.

    Thought it was interesting and that i should share the info....
     
  2. needmorechickens!

    needmorechickens! Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 2, 2008
    West TN
    Thanks for sharing...I have never run across this problem, but I bet others have.

    ~Rebecca
     
  3. sammi

    sammi Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 21, 2007
    Southeast USA
    Poly-vi-sol liquid baby vitamins are a good source of B vitamins.
    several of us suggest them when curly toes or leg problems show up..especially in chicks.
     
  4. ZooMummzy

    ZooMummzy Queen of the Zoo

    Mar 31, 2008
    Philomath, Oregon
    I have this problem right now with my special needs bantam. I'm giving Polyvisol and she is wearing a booty I made. So far it's not working but I'm hoping.
     
  5. Guitartists

    Guitartists Resistance is futile

    Mar 21, 2008
    Michigan
    I'm having a problem with wonkey toes, but only in one color variety....... can it be genetic?
     
  6. d.k

    d.k red-headed stepchild

    * The deficiency status is in the mother hen of the chick, resulting in the congenital defect. Treating your laying hens with riboflavin (vit. B2), if you have chicks showing up with the defect, will help eliminate the problem in future chicks. Current chicks need the boot to correct the defect. How much B-2/ riboflavin supplemental will help currently affected chicks is uncertain. Milk products, like plain yogurt, are also a good source of riboflavin.
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2008
  7. sammi

    sammi Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 21, 2007
    Southeast USA
    sometimes it is genetic..but it doesn't hurt to treat with vitamins and a shoe or boot..

    Zoomummzy..how long have you been treating?
    how much Poly-vi-sol are you giving?
     
  8. coloradochick

    coloradochick Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,503
    11
    213
    Dec 19, 2007
    Brighton, CO
    Interesting, I've got 1 Porcelain D'Uccle with both feet curled under and in from MMH and 3 Silkies, two with both feet and one with one foot curled and turned under and a Leghorn roo with several toes pointing off to the sides from Privett. They get around fine although the one Silkie with both feet turned under is 1/2 the size of the others but she's a go getter none the less. I have a soft spot for them when I see them in the brooders at the farm store [​IMG]
     
  9. sammi

    sammi Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 21, 2007
    Southeast USA
    d.k....true..but it doesn't hurt to give the chicks the riboflavin via yogurt and/or vitamins..
     
  10. TheMommaHen13

    TheMommaHen13 Out Of The Brooder

    14
    0
    24
    Jun 25, 2011
    I have a 3 month old Barred Rock who had her toes all curled under this morning out of nowhere. She's the same one that just last week had a puncture wound that we had a hard time getting to stop bleeding. That finally stopped and now this is happening. Is it possible the two incidents are related?? At any rate, we're going to try Poly Vi Sol drops today and see if that helps. Any other thoughts appreciated. Also, sidenote -- her comb last week when she was bleeding was very pale. Today it is dark red. What, if anything, does this signify? Thanks all!
    Larisa
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by