d

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by adorable, Sep 26, 2010.

  1. adorable

    adorable Chillin' With My Peeps

    756
    0
    159
    Aug 7, 2007
    near ottawa ontario
    d
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2010
  2. slackwater

    slackwater Chillin' With My Peeps

    771
    8
    141
    Feb 1, 2010
    SoMD
    Yep, it is cocci - sometimes, the stress of a move can bring a mild infection to a head. Need to treat w/Sulmet or Corid ASAP.
     
  3. PepsNick

    PepsNick Back to Business

    May 9, 2010
    Egglanta, GA
    Definetley cocci. I had 2 die of the same thing. Pick them up and see if runny stuff runs out of their mouth. Thats an even biggermsign of more serious cocci.
     
  4. adorable

    adorable Chillin' With My Peeps

    756
    0
    159
    Aug 7, 2007
    near ottawa ontario
    d
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2010
  5. PepsNick

    PepsNick Back to Business

    May 9, 2010
    Egglanta, GA
    I would to be safe. I know it can spread in chickens but im not sure to different breeds--- I'd recommend moving the turkeys for safety.
     
  6. PunkinPeep

    PunkinPeep Chillin' With My Peeps

    3,642
    19
    229
    Mar 31, 2009
    SouthEast Texas
    Pick them up and see if runny stuff runs out of their mouth. Thats an even bigger sign of more serious cocci.

    The above is not a sign of coccidiosis. Runny stuff can come out of their mouths when you pick them up just because you've pushed on their crop - or because they weren't done swallowing water. Cocci is an intestinal issue.

    The bloody stool is, however a sign of coccidiosis.

    Coccidiosis protozoa are species specific, meaning turkey cocci infects turkeys, and chicken cocci infects chickens, and dog cocci infects dogs. It is unusual for full grown chickens to have cocci, but since they are new to your place, i would definitely treat them immediately with Corid or some other brand of liquid Amprolium. If you can't get the liquid Amprolium, then Sulmet or powdered Amprolium can also be used. Let us know which you get so that we can advise the correct dose for the correct form of medicine.

    If your turkeys are in the same pen with your chickens, you may want to separate them while you medicate your chickens. The chickens need to drink only the medicated water while they're being treated, and you may not want to medicate your turkeys who aren't sick.​
     
  7. sonew123

    sonew123 Poultry Snuggie

    25,007
    68
    388
    Mar 16, 2009
    onchiota NY
    Quote:The above is not a sign of coccidiosis. Runny stuff can come out of their mouths when you pick them up just because you've pushed on their crop - or because they weren't done swallowing water. Cocci is an intestinal issue.

    The bloody stool is, however a sign of coccidiosis.

    Coccidiosis protozoa are species specific, meaning turkey cocci infects turkeys, and chicken cocci infects chickens, and dog cocci infects dogs. It is unusual for full grown chickens to have cocci, but since they are new to your place, i would definitely treat them immediately with Corid or some other brand of liquid Amprolium. If you can't get the liquid Amprolium, then Sulmet or powdered Amprolium can also be used. Let us know which you get so that we can advise the correct dose for the correct form of medicine.

    If your turkeys are in the same pen with your chickens, you may want to separate them while you medicate your chickens. The chickens need to drink only the medicated water while they're being treated, and you may not want to medicate your turkeys who aren't sick.

    [​IMG] beautifully said! [​IMG]
     
  8. PepsNick

    PepsNick Back to Business

    May 9, 2010
    Egglanta, GA
    Quote:The above is not a sign of coccidiosis. Runny stuff can come out of their mouths when you pick them up just because you've pushed on their crop - or because they weren't done swallowing water. Cocci is an intestinal issue.

    The bloody stool is, however a sign of coccidiosis.

    Coccidiosis protozoa are species specific, meaning turkey cocci infects turkeys, and chicken cocci infects chickens, and dog cocci infects dogs. It is unusual for full grown chickens to have cocci, but since they are new to your place, i would definitely treat them immediately with Corid or some other brand of liquid Amprolium. If you can't get the liquid Amprolium, then Sulmet or powdered Amprolium can also be used. Let us know which you get so that we can advise the correct dose for the correct form of medicine.

    If your turkeys are in the same pen with your chickens, you may want to separate them while you medicate your chickens. The chickens need to drink only the medicated water while they're being treated, and you may not want to medicate your turkeys who aren't sick.

    Really? Because a bird vet told me that... Sorry
     
  9. PunkinPeep

    PunkinPeep Chillin' With My Peeps

    3,642
    19
    229
    Mar 31, 2009
    SouthEast Texas
    Quote:The above is not a sign of coccidiosis. Runny stuff can come out of their mouths when you pick them up just because you've pushed on their crop - or because they weren't done swallowing water. Cocci is an intestinal issue.

    Really? Because a bird vet told me that... Sorry

    Honest mistake. You should be able to trust the "professionals," right? [​IMG]

    I don't have any medical degrees or other pieces of paper that make me right. However, i think it is important for all of us chicken keepers to be aware that there are a lot of vets out there who will tell people things about chickens that can be verified nowhere. Sad, but oh so true.

    I know there are - there must be - some really great avian vets out there who have their facts straight, but i have heard some amazing tales of misinformation since reading on BYC and researching matters on my own. [​IMG] So i would advise anyone to verify what your vet tells you by doing your own research. Google (or Bing or whatever) is our friend - we don't have to depend entirely on what a vet or anyone else tells us. We can do some research and find out a lot on our own - we can at least verify to make sure our "professionals" have their facts straight, so they don't lead us astray. This protects us and our chickens. [​IMG]

    That was a short soap box of mine. I'll step down now. [​IMG]
     
  10. PepsNick

    PepsNick Back to Business

    May 9, 2010
    Egglanta, GA
    Quote:Really? Because a bird vet told me that... Sorry

    Honest mistake. You should be able to trust the "professionals," right? [​IMG]

    I don't have any medical degrees or other pieces of paper that make me right. However, i think it is important for all of us chicken keepers to be aware that there are a lot of vets out there who will tell people things about chickens that can be verified nowhere. Sad, but oh so true.

    I know there are - there must be - some really great avian vets out there who have their facts straight, but i have heard some amazing tales of misinformation since reading on BYC and researching matters on my own. [​IMG] So i would advise anyone to verify what your vet tells you by doing your own research. Google (or Bing or whatever) is our friend - we don't have to depend entirely on what a vet or anyone else tells us. We can do some research and find out a lot on our own - we can at least verify to make sure our "professionals" have their facts straight, so they don't lead us astray. This protects us and our chickens. [​IMG]

    That was a short soap box of mine. I'll step down now. [​IMG]

    Lol thanks
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by