dain bramage

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by TheHenMaster91, Mar 10, 2015.

  1. TheHenMaster91

    TheHenMaster91 Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 23, 2014
    Ketchikan, Alaska
    Received my order of 25 +1 from Mcmurrays, all alive, by the next day Ive lost three, all stiff legged and arched backs. However my plus 1 rare chick, golden laced polish for the curious, I was able to give sugar water and he rallied. ...sort of. Hes itching his head a lot then going limp and arching his head back. Hes peeping and occasionally drinking if i dip beak, but he cant stand without flopping or itching and flopping. Hes the only one itching excessively. Right now hes getting drops of blue Gatorade....but I'm scared hes going to drown on it. All chicks are in a pine bedding cage, room temp is just under 75. They have. Brinsea ecoglow. Two dishes of organic scratch peck brand starter and two sugar water dishes with marbles. Any suggestions? Any idea whats wrong?
     
  2. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    Apr 8, 2013
    Australia
    Botulism? :/ Heavy metal poisoning is another possibility, any chance these chicks were exposed to fuel fumes during transport?

    Would rather doubt it's a deficiency but will link to some info just in case:
    Quote: And some more info...
    Quote: http://www.merckmanuals.com/vet/nervous_system.html

    Have you rung the hatchery to let them know and asked for their thoughts on this?

    Do they only have sugar water available or fresh water as well?

    Are they all on the same feed... If so, might be aflatoxins or other contaminations in it.

    Any chance of mold spores in the cage, or chemical contamination, are the water dishes glazed ceramic, or tin, or alloy?

    Best wishes and good luck with the remaining ones.
     
  3. TheHenMaster91

    TheHenMaster91 Out Of The Brooder

    41
    1
    24
    Sep 23, 2014
    Ketchikan, Alaska
    I would have no idea what they were exposed to before I picked them up at the post office, the hatchery suggested I feed the remaining sick one Gatorade, which I have been doing, although hes not drinking much. As far as the twitching and itchy, hatchery said it may be something in the environment, but the polish is the only sick one now, and the only one twitch itchin. They 4 days old when I got them, so I did expect a few loses, but Im up to 4 dead and one sick in 26 batch, which just seems like too many. The water dishes are ceramic ramekins, like for making creme brulee, day one they all got fresh water, replaced with sugar water, and last night I rinsed them out and switched to just plain water. They all are eating scratch and peck starter crumbles, its smells fresh, looks fine, no mold or anything. This morning, now 48 hours after their arrival, everyone seems fine, except the polish whos still dragging on, I need baby chick first aid.
     
  4. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    Apr 8, 2013
    Australia
    This morning, now 48 hours after their arrival, everyone seems fine, except the polish whos still dragging on, I need baby chick first aid.

    Electrolytes are an important part of first aid, honey is better than sugar for that, asides from that you need to keep it warm enough and provide vitamin/mineral mix probably in liquid format and feed it to the chick if it's not drinking or eating voluntarily, or not enough.

    (You apparently have the situation about as 'covered' as it's about to get, when neurological symptoms like that are shown there's not really any specific first aid that's going to help unfortunately; without a diagnosis on what's wrong treatment is just life support --- so heat, electrolytes, nutrients, basically --- and see if they recover).

    If it can move under its own volition I'd assume it's regulating its own temperature sufficiently, provided it has access to heat sources and cooler places, so you probably don't need to do anything there.

    Good luck. Sorry I can't help more but those are some very serious symptoms for any chicken to exhibit never mind an infant one, suggests something went severely wrong and survival chances generally are not good.
     
  5. TheHenMaster91

    TheHenMaster91 Out Of The Brooder

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    1
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    Sep 23, 2014
    Ketchikan, Alaska
    A whole new brooder set up, different dishes, tossed the ecoglow and went back to a heat bulb in a clamp lamp. Thermometer in there says its exactly 90* woke up with two more dead, so I think all my silver laced wyandottes are gone now. Ive lost 9 total, polish has recovered but is so much smaller than everyone hes getting trample. Im really heartbroken about losing so many, I wont be ordering again, just too many lost.
     
  6. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    Apr 8, 2013
    Australia
    Sorry to hear it. Losses can indeed be very disheartening.

    Don't really have any more advice for you, except that it's always luck of the draw, a bit chancy, whether you're rearing your own from your own incubation or hens, or ordering them in through the mail, or picking them up yourself from a breeder.

    Every now and then losses will occur no matter how careful everyone involved may be. Quite often careless is actually what they are, but, we don't know for sure so it's kind of pointless to speculate.

    One of the most bizarrely random incidents I've lost chicks to was a rabid rat attack followed not an hour later by a phascogale attack, both attacks on the same mother and chicks, in a cage with two hens on clutches. The second hen and chicks were not molested at all.

    The killers just went under that one hen, never hurt her, just dragged out her babies and wreaked havoc on them. Talk about unlucky --- not to mention unlikely! When I arrived, the poor chicks were mostly still alive, disemboweled, I had to put them down. They just killed chick after chick after chick, it was a massacre.

    Neither predator attacked for food, all they did was injure the chicks. The rat couldn't eat, it was walking around screaming nonstop in agony, pretty advanced rabies case. The phascogale was healthy but apparently not hungry, showed up an hour after we dispatched the rat.

    (The rat we killed, the phascogale we got a wildlife officer to pick up).

    Good luck in future.
     

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