danger in have a metal door in the dog/chicken run

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by sunflowerenvy, Oct 25, 2010.

  1. sunflowerenvy

    sunflowerenvy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 4, 2010
    south/west tn
    if this is the wrong place to post this please move it to the right location

    this this the door that goes into the run. it become a very danger and unforgiveable human error

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    like always i go out to give my girls treats in the late moring i always find my silver campine walk out the pen. She fly up
    trying to get out this morning she did not make it out she slide down between the two pipes from the top and she strangle her self on the gate handle. plz some how cover that the chicken head cannot get stuck, right now iam to upset to figure out how to fix it

    [​IMG]
    we buried mrs roo by her buddies

    it is my lost [​IMG] but maybe u wont lose a baby pet this way
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2010
  2. Imp

    Imp All things share the same breath- Chief Seattle

    I am so sorry you lost her.

    I found that they could wiggle through the chainlink, at the bottom, so I use a chainlink clamp and a extra pole connecteor to close in the gap. So they cannot get out.

    Imp

    If you'd like a pic, I can get one. Your gaps are not as large as mine though.
     
  3. sunflowerenvy

    sunflowerenvy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 4, 2010
    south/west tn
    Quote:yes i would

    it happen between the door that open and that pole that u hinge that locks the door on her head was on the gate handle to open the door. the door handle was always hard to open
     
  4. Imp

    Imp All things share the same breath- Chief Seattle

    I'm not sure this will help with your littler gaps, but you could use a hacksaw to make the connector shorter, and then clamp into the corner. Maybe you could cut a triangular piece of wood to clamp into the corner. Since the clamps are made for chain link it makes it easy to use.
    Here in this pic, I used 2 connectors, with the ends in the clamp. It does not go all the way to the ground because I have a little feral cat that squeezes under to get in & out. And it barely touches the gate, so I can swing it shut without overshooting.

    Hope this makes sense

    Imp

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2010
  5. sunflowerenvy

    sunflowerenvy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 4, 2010
    south/west tn
    Quote:u see that conectorts and that pipe that is stick in ground her head got stuck between it and hang her self there i will take pic of it when it stop raining

    i went out to take a pic where the chicken was i used oven mitt to show you where the bird was.
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    close up
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    Last edited: Oct 25, 2010
  6. WoodlandWoman

    WoodlandWoman Overrun With Chickens

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    Wisconsin
    I'm sorry for your loss. That's terrible. Sometimes they get themselves into bad situations, that we never would have imagined.

    Is it possible that her head went though that much larger opening at the top and she slid down that far as she tried to get free? With parrots, fancy cage designs that have v-shaped openings between some of the bars have also strangled birds. Scroll work or arches can be a problem, where the v is wider at the top and narrower at the bottom.

    I'm thinking that you could attach something that covers the gaps, attached to the fencing. If it sticks just a tiny amount into the doorway, your door would only swing one way, instead of either way. I don't think it would be a problem. Choose something stiff and make whatever you use wide enough that you can secure it on the main vertical tube that is the edge of the fence and on the horizontal tubes at the top, midway up and the bottom. That should keep it from being wobbly.

    A board would probably work best. A big strip of hardware cloth might work. That's fairly stiff. You'd need to cover the edge or bend it back at the doorway, to keep it from being a scratching hazard. I'm sure others will have some ideas for you.
     
  7. mgw

    mgw Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 29, 2010
    Eastern Wa.
    Sorry for your loss, it really seems like a freak accident though.
     
  8. rungirl

    rungirl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 7, 2010
    Columbus, Ohio
    I have the exact same kind of kennel fence and door on my run. I have poultry netting over the top to keep out hawks. It's wrapped around that top bar fastened all the way around which stops the the chickens from trying to fly up to the top. Do you think that might help you?


    Lisa
     
  9. sunflowerenvy

    sunflowerenvy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 4, 2010
    south/west tn
    Quote:i have net cover all the top.
    WoodlandWoman quote
    Is it possible that her head went though that much larger opening at the top and she slid down that far as she tried to get free? With parrots, fancy cage designs that have v-shaped openings between some of the bars have also strangled birds. Scroll work or arches can be a problem, where the v is wider at the top and narrower at the bottom.


    that what i am thinking she slide off the top of the door what away go.
    laura
     
  10. rungirl

    rungirl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 7, 2010
    Columbus, Ohio
    OK, one question though... From your picture, it looks like there is a shade cloth netting or tarp over the run. Is there netting also that I'm not seeing? The reason I'm asking is that it looks like there is a gap around the edge at the top. I'm thinking that maybe the birds are trying to fly up there and perch on the top bar. If they do that, I could see how maybe they could miss the landing and slide down and then get caught in the gap of the door. If the netting goes all the way to the top bar, then it would discourage them from trying to fly up there. I use a very thin netting from TSC that is actually called deer netting. Is that what you have? I'm just trying get a clear understanding.

    Lisa
     

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