Dark or light??!!!

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by juzzk, Oct 31, 2013.

  1. juzzk

    juzzk Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 29, 2013
    New South Wales
    Hi all, just wondering if you would say these are light or dark barred Plymouth rocks?
    We have a mix of each, and does anyone else find that there rocks took a lot longer to grow and get feathers. These are about 9ish weeks old I think.
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    Barred Rocks of good breeding have a slow feathering gene. This is the "stop and start" gene that colors the feathers with the distinct barring. They take forever to feather out, although feeding a high protein chick feed does help.

    I believe the land of OZ still recognizes both Light and Dark varieties, while in North America, after a lengthy battle over the issue in the early 1900's, this was abandoned.

    If a utility Rock is bred to feather out in less than 8 weeks, it will be quite fuzzy barring. It's just the laws of nature. The fuzzy, cuckoo, production types are more commonly sold from hatcheries in North America.

    Nice birds.
     
  3. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    So Fred, does that mean the lighter bird in the pic is female? I've not heard of light and dark barred rocks.
     
  4. juzzk

    juzzk Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 29, 2013
    New South Wales
    We got them from a man in Queensland who breeds them, he said that I think the light coloured are rare. But I have herd of them and don't think there ment to be rare.
    Also he told us the eggs were HUGE @the size of emu eggs" but they were smaller then our normal eggs.
     
  5. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    Yes, there is one "light" variety chick in that photo. Again, we once had Light and Dark at the time when these birds were crated up and sold around the world, including Australia, back in the early 1900's.

    We never did decide to designate Light and Dark. The APA chose not to do both variety.


    The line breeding required for Lights and Darks is different. This guy's statement about egg size is likely hyperbole.
     
  6. aoxa

    aoxa Overrun With Chickens

    Wow learn something new every day...

    I always thought the light and dark is a gender indication only (and not in some lines).

    [​IMG]
    Pretty clear colour difference in my Rocks. The males are always lighter than females. At least with the line I have ;) I know some Stukel and GSPPR Rocks have darker coloured males.

    I prefer the lighter colouring to be honest. I'd like to see more white in some of my females.
     
  7. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    [​IMG]

    I wish I could give proper credit to the owner of this photo. This is in the US a century ago. Note the Lights in the photo.
    Even in black and white, they are Lights.

    The old journals from the era, readable on line, discuss this. Google Plymouth Rock Journal or similar, for really great reading of how things were at the turn of the previous century, here in the USA, the original home of the Plymouth Rock.
     
  8. aoxa

    aoxa Overrun With Chickens

    Beautiful photo!

    I love that journal and have it bookmarked, so I will check it out. Thanks :)
     
  9. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    Me too! I'm glad they're not in the US, that would throw my whole sexing mojo right out the window......
     

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