day 17, horrific dog attack. should I bathe her?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by lalaland, Dec 16, 2015.

  1. lalaland

    lalaland Overrun With Chickens

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    hen with multiple puncture wounds, deep enough to insert finger up to knuckle. wounds were rinsed, and nustock (sulphur and pine tar oil ointment) was applied, poured into puncture wounds). I have checked skin temp next to some of the wounds and there is no heat from infection.

    She is doing ok, still not back to normal eating but appetite is improving. She is in a wire cage in the coop with supportive heat from heat panel (its in the 20's here). very talkative. moves slowly. stretches wings, grooms (still in molt). wings hang funny from her shoulders because of puncture wounds underneath, almost armpit location.

    one wound appears to be draining a bit based on appearance of feathers. this is day 17 of attack.

    She really freaks about being handled. In almost 15 years of chicken keeping, I would say she is in the top 3 as far as hating being picked up or restrained. she does a mjaor major flip out and puts everything into escape.

    I am undecided about whether to try to bathe her and get a closer look at wounds. She will definitely open up wounds from struggling and may reinjure whatever soft tissue/muscle injuries she has going on.

    Anyone with experience in deep puncture wounds want to weigh in? I don't believe there is an active infection based on smell, and I can't see any drainage, feathers just have that look though. question is, better to leave her be or to intervene?
     
  2. BeanHen

    BeanHen Out Of The Brooder

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    Sorry to hear about such a terrible attack!

    I don't have extensive knowledge about deep wound care, but it would seem as if you're doing all you can for her for now. As long as she's coated in Nustock and isn't showing signs of obvious infection, you may want to just wait it out. Especially if she's molting and fearful of people.

    Based on her behavior, (I'm sure you know this from your many years of chicken-keeping experience, but I might as well throw it out there [​IMG]) it'd probably work well to inspect her at night when she's in the sleeping-hen trance, and with a towel over her head if possible.

    Hopefully someone else with more experience can add on...

    Good luck to both you and your hen in the meantime!
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2015
  3. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Sits With Chickens Premium Member

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    I have had a few over the years with deep wounds, though not that deep, I have had good luck just leaving them alone to heal naturally, it will take a long time, at this point I wouldn't mess with the wounds or the bird, I might give her a broad spectrum antibiotic in her water to help stave off any infections, and I also believe some moving around will help with keeping circulation strong which helps with healing, so some area to move around but not too much. The fact that she's still alive is a great sign of her fortitude.
     
  4. lalaland

    lalaland Overrun With Chickens

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    I appreciate the advice from you both!. I gave her the freedom to roam in the coop, other than attempting unsuccessfully to fly up to a roost, she pretty much stayed put. Think I will let her be for now. She's back in the kennel but I will try to give her some supervised time to move a bit more. will hold off on messing with her wounds. thanks!
    it helps to bounce stuff off other chicken folks.
     
  5. GodofPecking

    GodofPecking Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would like to suggest the use of honey as a better alternative treatment for cleaning and sterilizing these kinds of wounds. It is cheap and easy to find. I have nothing against nustock and I'm sure it works, it's just not common throughout the world, like honey is. The glucose lactase in natural honey is a living enzyme which slowly consumes a little honey and releases hydrogen peroxide as a byproduct of it's metabolism. This is in tiny amounts which are not harmful to people chickens or bees, but quite deadly to germs, giving honey it's anti-bacterial, anti septic and anti fungal properties.

    Apply it by dipping your finger into some honey and dabbing on the wound, after a few minutes, or sooner if you feel any discomfort, pour drinking water over the wound to wash it away. On people, it makes a wound look clean like you just took a one hour bath, but it takes minutes.

    I would leave her be while she looks fighting fit, and keep a careful watch for changes. If she needs to have intervention, try to do it at night by putting a large cloth over her, so she doesn't move and it should keep her quite and untroubled. Then uncover the parts you want to work on. It would be a good idea to have someone hold her very gently, if that is possible, but the cloth is quite similar in effect to an assistant when none are available. TRIM the feathers around the area using scissors. A bald healthy chook is a happy chook. I often trim the feathers of my chickens for various reasons and it works very very well. It makes things much easier to follow up over and over again without needing to touch the chook.
     
  6. lalaland

    lalaland Overrun With Chickens

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    you know, I never thought of honey which is funny because I use it on myself. My mom is diabetic and often has foot wounds, I've suggested honey to her but she pooh-poohed the idea and wouldn't use it. Then, a year ago she was hospitalized and having difficulty healing, and the docs used a "medi'honey thing, saying it was the newest way to treat infections Hah!

    I will leave her be, but if I do end up bathing her will try honey. I have some good raw honey which should work well.
     
  7. LeafBlade12345

    LeafBlade12345 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Personally, I wouldn't put honey, but that's just me. It's a great way to invite infection, but it is totally your call. It may be helpful to spray some Blu-kote on the wounds, apply neosporin, and wrap them up. You may also choose to make your chicken a sling if she needs it. Also, give her electrolytes in her water to keep her strength up.

    Good luck!
     
  8. GodofPecking

    GodofPecking Chillin' With My Peeps

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    https://www.google.com.au/search?q=honey+resistant+wounds

    Yes, there are some people for which it raises eyebrows, and of course there are ignorant people in the world, however honey is THE treatment for wounds, bar none. Flour is good on the battlefield but honey is for everything else.

    Where all modern antibiotics are failing in the face of antibiotic resistant strains and 'super-bugs' honey just goes on working perfectly, BETTER than modern medicines, because Bees have been on this planet for a whole lot longer than humans. After more than 100 million years of experience, they know how to deal with bacteria.
     
  9. LeafBlade12345

    LeafBlade12345 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Believe me, I've used honey on my quail before. What happened? They all got serious infections and died within the next couple of days. No offense, but bees do not make honey to be used as a medicinal property. Honey can be helpful with humans, but many honeys out there these days are definitely not healthy. Raw honey is the best. With EM and hospital experience I can tell you that honey can be helpful. Yet in this case, I do not think that "natural" remedies are the right way to go. This is past tha point. The chicken is in critical condition. OP, make sure to keep the pullet's wounds clean and covered. You can keep her in a makeshift dog crate or box inside with some towels or blankets to keep her comfortable. Make sure she can easily access food and water.

    Good luck!
    Leaf
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 20, 2015
  10. GodofPecking

    GodofPecking Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The best thing about honey besides the fact that it works perfectly is that it is so very gentle. So many people who have no idea about honey use harsh antiseptic or antibacterial agents that hurt or stain. Honey is perfectly safe and doesn't stain, doesn't hurt much or often, you just dab it on the wound with your finger after dipping your finger in it, then wait for a few minutes, OR until it stings, then wash off with drinking water. Mostly it doesn't sting, but you can have really messed up nerves open in the wound and honey doesn't sting much if at all, it's just that on some wounds, after a minute or so, you can feel it. That signals it's time for comfort so pour drinking water over the wound and you're done.
     

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