Day 2 stress. High temp!

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by BentoMinion, Feb 15, 2013.

  1. BentoMinion

    BentoMinion Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I want to swat my friend. So the temps in my incubator stabilized later last night at about 100*. I got up several times and it was between 99.5 and 100.1. Now, the incubator is in my bedroom right next to my bed. It is out of reach of the kids and what not. I went to check temp this afternoon and it was at 105.6!!!!!!!!!!! My friend (who is staying with us for a bit) was in there folding clothes for some reason (she has no business in my room) and she said she looked at the temp and it was below what she though it should be and turned it up. She said she turned it several times because it was not heating very fast.... She said she did this at 8 this morning and I caught it at about 1:50pm.... The temp taken was taken at the top area of the eggs. Do you think they will be ok? This is my first time hatching. This would be day 2 in the incubator. It's a full incubator.
     
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    Swat your friend HARD!!!
    Some may survive but any significant time over 104 is deadly. 4 hours might be construed as significant.
    I once hatched 2 chicks out of 18 that frequently ran up to 108 but only for short periods.
    Also, measuring at the top of the egg means the middle is higher unless you have a fan.

    If you read the following link it may give you the info you need.
    http://www.brinsea.com/customerservice/poweroff.html
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2013
  3. BentoMinion

    BentoMinion Chillin' With My Peeps

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    No fan.

    I may cry. I have 40 some odd eggs in there. Thanks
     
  4. wantedman66

    wantedman66 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I wouldn't worry unless it was at that temp for a couple hours or more.the first time I hatched my temps were going crazy from 98 to as high as 105 and this was through the entire incubation I was freaking out but like clockwork they all pipped on day 21 and was a 100% hatch rate I could'nt believe it so hang in there and good luck.
     
  5. BentoMinion

    BentoMinion Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That's the thing. She was in there at 8am doing clothes and IDK how long it was that high. It could have been 4 1/2 hours assuming it took the incubator an hour to get that hot (which it could have been less).

    Thanks for your response, It gives me some hope.
     
  6. wantedman66

    wantedman66 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    No problem the only thing I would say is wait a couple days and try candleling them,because it does take at least a couple hours for eggs to regulate to a different temp post your results after checking them.
     
  7. Sally Sunshine

    Sally Sunshine Cattywampus Angel <straightens Halo> Premium Member

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    https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/hatching-eggs-101 this is a paste from that article below..... for STILL AIR you need a higher temp BUT NOT that high...

    TEMPERATURE
    Never trust the thermometer that comes with the incubator, always check it.
    The thermometer that came with my incubator was off by 5 degrees.

    That could mean life or death for your babies.
    With a Forced Air Incubator (fan model) you can get the best hatch rate by keeping the temperature at 99.5º F. throughout the entire incubation period. HOWEVER, when using a Still Air incubator (no fan) at 102º F. The reason for different temperatures is that with a fan model the circulating air warms all around the egg while still air temperatures are warmer at the top of the egg than at the bottom. Therefore, increasing the temperature at the top of the egg will compensate for the egg's cooler parts. The temperature is measured at the level where the embryos develop (at the top of the egg). Minor fluctuations (less than ½ degree) above or below 100 degrees are tolerated. Temperatures only a degree or two above the recommended temperatures can kill chicks within 15-30 minutes depending on how high the temperature is and the developmental stage of the embryo. A high temperature tends to produce early hatches. A consistently cooler temperature tends to increase incubation times and produce weakened chicks. In both cases the total chicks hatched will be reduced. Prepare your incubator and run it for several days before adding eggs, to be positive you are maintaining correct incubation temperature. NOTE: It is common that when adding eggs the temperature will drop but should come back up to correct temperature within an hour or two. Don’t rest the thermometer's bulb touching the eggs or the incubator. Incorrect readings will result.
    Did you know that 10/13 day old embryos begin to produce excess heat in the incubator? Most large commercial incubators will spend more time cooling than heating!



    CALIBRATION! YES! It’s IMPORTANT!
    Calibrate the thermometer/s you are using for your Incubator. I use 3 thermometers! You need to make sure your thermometer is reading correctly, Even one degree may cause serious problems with your hatch! A simple method without specialized instruments and knowledge is to compare your thermometer/hygrometer with other devices. If your thermometer (or the one you compare it with) goes at least from 0°C to 100°C you can also calibrate it with crushed ice. The thermometer should read 32 degrees in a mixture of crushed ice and a little water. If it reads, say, 30 degrees, then you can either adjust the thermometer until it is correct (if the style of the thermometer permits adjustment), or else you will at least know your thermometer reads 2 degrees too cool and adjust your thinking--and your incubator--accordingly.

    More information on Calibrating your thermometer/hygrometer
    http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-make-a-styrofoam-quotstill-airquot-egg-/step4/Calibrate-your-thermometerhygrometer/

    http://www.swowea.org/Thermometer%20Calibration.pdf

    Rebel’s Thermometer Calibration
    http://cmfarm.us/ThermometerCalibration.html

    Rebel’s Hygrometer Calibration
    http://cmfarm.us/HygrometerCalibration.html
    NOTE: Some incubators, even expensive ones may have "hot spots" or "cool spots" depending on air circulation inside the incubator.

    Probe thermometer & water weasel (Water Wiggler, Water Snake) found on Amazon or Ebay make for EXCELLENT internal temp guides! The perfect internal temperature of an embryo is 99.5 degrees. If you can't find a water wiggler you can make your own with ziplock filled with water folded in half and insert the probe in the center middle.
    [​IMG] [​IMG]


    Examples of thermometers and hygrometers
    I personally like to keep a digital one that also keeps track of “highs and lows” along with 2 incubator thermometers AND a PROBE! It depends on how scientific you plan your hatch!
    More Important than make/model is CALIBRATION.
    It NEEDS TO BE SPOT ON!
     
  8. Sally Sunshine

    Sally Sunshine Cattywampus Angel <straightens Halo> Premium Member

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  9. PoultryGirly

    PoultryGirly Chillin' With My Peeps

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    How are your eggs doing? Did you candle them yet?
     

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