Day 23 under broody hen - UPDATE - 2 pips and one low floater!

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Engteacher, Nov 27, 2010.

  1. Engteacher

    Engteacher Poultry, Poetry, and Prose

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    Sep 1, 2009
    Hastings, MN
    We had five eggs that were all developing well on day 14. Two hatched on day 21 and three have not.

    Do I let my broody decide when to give up or should I remove them from her at some point?


    Should I candle them again? What should I be looking for?

    The food and water are only inches from her and the two chicks. I've seen both babies eat and drink before running back to warm feather blankets. By the way, we're in Minnesota so the coop is dry but cold. Daytime is about 45 degrees and night is about 30 or so. Broody seemed to have all five eggs tucked in well, but maybe these three got cold at some point and slowed or stopped growing.

    If anyone out there can give me some advice, I'd sure appreciate it.
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2010
  2. card5640

    card5640 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 27, 2009
    Bangor area, Maine
    Hello from cold Maine, I had two hatch out of 4 eggs on Thanksgiving, they were not due to hatch until today so I gave the other eggs until today to hatch and then threw them in the compost, nothing had developed. I wiggled the eggs a bit and thye sounded watery. I was thrilled that she got 2 in this cold. I now have them in an enclosed area 20x 32 and have a heat lamp at the end it encourages them to come out and eat, it is a green bulbed flood light so its not too bright. I have the water in a tiny heated dog dish with a platform around it. I go out 2-4 xs a day and make sure they are eating and drinking, for the first night I hung a heating pad on one side to take the chill off. Good luck
     
  3. Engteacher

    Engteacher Poultry, Poetry, and Prose

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    Hastings, MN
    I'm thinking about doing the float test on them tomorrow. If they aren't wiggling, then I'll toss them. It'll be easier to see if they're alive than trying to candle them. I'm glad she got two chicks anyway. We'll see if she can keep them warm for the next few months until they feather in. I don't want to bring them into the house and I can't run a heat lamp for them or they'll blow a fuse. She was so determined to brood and I didn't really want to try to break her, so I only gave her a few eggs. So far so good!

    Stay warm!
     
  4. Engteacher

    Engteacher Poultry, Poetry, and Prose

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    Sep 1, 2009
    Hastings, MN
    I just went down to the coop to float my eggs and found two pips and faint cheeping from two of the eggs. The third I put in 100 degree water and saw that it was a low floater. I carefully replaced them under my hen and will keep my fingers crossed that they can right themselves into a good position to continue their hard work. Hatching must be such an ordeal.

    It's day 24.
     
  5. elloyd

    elloyd Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 24, 2010
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    what does puting them in water do i have eggds in the bator that were to hatch friday noght at 9 that would have been 21 days one hatched in the middle of the night and we woke up to watch one hatch saturday morning so we still have 8 to go no pips as of yet so i just want to know if i could try this float test and what to do and look for any info will help i am new at this
     
  6. Engteacher

    Engteacher Poultry, Poetry, and Prose

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    Hastings, MN
    I found it here: https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=383525

    This
    is a quote from the discussion. JJMR794 is the author.

    "Many Folks Are Having Eggs Go Overdue For Hatch And Wondering If They Are Duds, Late, Or Have Had Some Sort Of Fetal Demise.... The Float Test Is Simple Yet Effect Way Of Checking Egg Viability.

    I Normally Give Eggs A Full 24 Hrs Overdue Before Float Testing. It Works On All Bird Eggs- Period! Takes Very Little Equipment Or Time To Do And Is Easy To Perform.


    Start With A Bowl Of Sufficient Depth To Allow The Eggs Your Testing To Float Freely Or Sink. Add 100 Degree Water To The Needed Level And Allow It To Settle( Quit Swirling And Calm Down)

    Once Settled Take The Egg Or Eggs To Be Tested And Gently Lower Them Into The Water With As Little Disturbance As Possible. You May Need To Wait A Few Minutes For The Water To Settle Again After Adding Egg/ Eggs. Then Just Watch....

    Eggs Are Judged By Observation With Results As Follows:

    1. Sinker= Dud, Never Developed

    2. High Floater (like A Fishing Bobber Without Weights) Say 45% Or More Of The Egg Above The Water Line= Dud, No Development Or Fetal Demise, Likely Rupture Of Internal Membranes Causing The Egg To Dehydrate.

    3. Low Floater= Viable Egg, Development Full Term

    4. Low Floater Rockin And Rollin! This Is The Live Embryo Moving Inside The Egg= Definate Viable Egg!

    Once Test Results Complete Take Viable Eggs And Gently Pat Dry And Replace In Hatcher. Duds Are Best Discarded At This Time.


    It Should Be Noted All Eggs Warrant Close Inspection Prior To Float Testing--- Any Pips In The Shell? Do Not Float Test! If The Shell Is Broken, Pipped Or Cracked In Any Way Water May Enter And Drown The Chick Inside

    This Test Works Off Of Air Cell Development With Embryo Growth. Infertile Eggs Will Have An Underdeveloped Or Absent Air Cell That Isnt Large Enough To Float The Egg....thus The Sinkers. Ruptured Membranes Will Allow The Egg To Dehydrate.... Thus The High Floater. Proper Development Of The Embryo Will Cause The Air Cell To Develope To The Point Where Viable Eggs Will Float With Approximately 10-15% Of The Egg Above The Water Line--- These Are The Viable Eggs. Obvious Movement Of The Egg Shows Signs Of Life For The Chick Within. Works On All Bird Eggs From Hummingbirds To Ostriches"

    Hope this helps you!
     
  7. Engteacher

    Engteacher Poultry, Poetry, and Prose

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    Sep 1, 2009
    Hastings, MN
    Now four have hatched. Our low floater still hasn't pipped, but I'll give it a bit more time and see what happens.
     

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