Day 25!!!!

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by michael0641, May 25, 2008.

  1. michael0641

    michael0641 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 17, 2008
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    I had 2 eggs hatch last Wed (day 21) and no more yet..Should I discard or wait..Temp. is 100 and humidity 70.
     
  2. My Little Sister's Farm

    My Little Sister's Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 13, 2008
    Forest Grove, Oregon
    i think you're done, they are all dead by now.

    i think your humidity is too high, i think it is to be between 45-55 with an average around 50% being the best. They may have not been able to release enough water and "drowned" in the egg.
     
  3. michael0641

    michael0641 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 17, 2008
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    Everything I've read says to have 70% humidity the last 3 days...One of my buddies had an egg hatch 1 week late.
     
  4. My Little Sister's Farm

    My Little Sister's Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 13, 2008
    Forest Grove, Oregon
    really, then i guess keep doing what you're doing. at 99.5-100.5 and 50% humidity I have 95-100% hatches every time for the last 5 years. As long as there aren't any spikes in temp, which I don't have because of the type of bator I have now, I don't have any problems. 70% just seems like it wouldn't allow enough water loss, but keep doing what works for you if it is.
     
  5. michael0641

    michael0641 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 17, 2008
    Sylacauga Alabama
    Don't really know if it is working or not...This is the first time incubating...But I didn't candle the eggs so they might not be fertile anyways...I guess I should have done that...Next time I'll keep the humidity at 50%...It was for the first 18 days.
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2008
  6. hinkjc

    hinkjc Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    50% humidity is for the first 18 days. At hatch time 65-70% is the correct humidity goal.

    Jody
     
  7. My Little Sister's Farm

    My Little Sister's Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 13, 2008
    Forest Grove, Oregon
    hmm...i guess my chicks don't read the same books as yours [​IMG]
     
  8. DuckLady

    DuckLady Administrator Staff Member

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    Jody, would the difference in humidity depends on your part of the country? Forest Grove in Oregon is very rainy. Would that affect how to set humidity for Little Sister? Would the additional moisture in her air push the humidity up to the correct level?

    BTW, Hink JC knows more about hatching eggs than most and has a huge rep for quality in her advice. [​IMG]
     
  9. hinkjc

    hinkjc Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Humidity that is measured within the incubator is what should determine a successful hatch. The only thing I would consider is that you would need less water in your incubator to bring it to the correct reading, although the reading for humidity would be consistent inside the incubator regardless of where you live.

    To give an example: Where I live most of the time humidity is around 20-30% relative in my house. When adding water to my incubator for hatch, I need to add more water (approx 2 cups of surface water) to reach appropriate humidity level of 70% relative for a successful hatch.

    For someone who lives in an area that regularly maintains 50% humidity in their home, would likely add much less water to reach the same incubation humidity levels.

    Someone who lives in an area of 70% humidity would add almost no water for a hatch to be successful.

    Since the reading is inside the incubator, you would determine how much water (and surface area) you need, but the relative humidity needed for successful hatches is still the same.

    I will also add that for my Sportsman, it holds a higher humidity during incubation of approximately 60%-65% relative and you rarely need to increase humidity if you hold the hatch in the same bator because incubation humidity was so high, you do not want to increase it at hatch time.

    If you have very good instruments for measuring humidity or learn from trial and error, you learn that hygrometers are not consistent and even when one reads 50, it may actually be off by quite a bit. I have one that reads 59%, but by comparing it to a more reliable hygrometer, I know it is off by 10% and is actually 69% relative humidity. Gauges are often off and providing users inaccurate readings. It's best to learn what water levels you need in your area to ensure optimal hatches. Most times folks don't realize this until they experience a failed hatch of sticky chicks or mushy chicks to figure out things are not what they seem. However, hard lessons are always learning opportunities.

    Jody
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2008

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