Day 9 candle, air cells still detached. Should I worry?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Barbedwirecat, Mar 7, 2012.

  1. Barbedwirecat

    Barbedwirecat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 16, 2011
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    Doing just as I have with previous hatches. Semi dry incubation ( keeping around 35%--dipped to 16% at one point around day 4, I got worried and added water). I let them rest 24 hours before putting them in the incubator and then waited another 24 before starting the turner. Temp between 99 and 101.

    They feel lighter than normal.

    The air cells move around, are not circular and have dips in them and wiggle. They almost look like flowers. I have 4 viable eggs from my stock in there with normal cells. They all are growing healthy minus the aircells. veining is normal (some have smaller veins, but I still consider this normal) One blood ring (from my OWN stock--not shipped).

    I know there is nothing I can do, but should I be worried about hatching?
     
  2. aveca

    aveca Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Waverly, NY
    my vet gave me a plan sheet quite a few years ago..it says for shipped eggs after the initial 24 hr rest period she had me place them in the forced airin turner but do not turn the turner on for the 1st 5 - 7 days depending on the damage..i have seen some pretty bad bubbly air cells heal as they grow and become surrounded by the veining..that gives embryo time to get a good start, after that a candeling and turner goes on..you will be suprised that those will hatch, hatch them in upright position in case air cell tends to travel a lot at lockdown time. we hatched a bunch of del eggs for a freind that were shipped.
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2012
  3. aveca

    aveca Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 30, 2009
    Waverly, NY
    i should add to that they used to hatch rare endangered parrots and other birds a long time ago through a cornell program..when they would collect up eggs from their own collection barns they would bring them right in and put them in a working egg turner on counters..

    .the shipped eggs were all set still in stable temps in cartons so they wouldnt get shocked by sudden temp changes ect..there were 2 schools of thought on this, one was the eggs needed to be turned mainley in the first part of incubation , others beleive that sitting still for the first 5 -7 days and as long as 8 days gives the already developing blastoderm a chance to get a healthy start and become stable in an already wobbly environment...sometimes these have already gotten a good start even befor they are shipped and that is when most of the damage is done as the tiny veins and structure in the yolk are so delicate..she uses big words to describe those workings that i cant remember. but i understood what she meant...its a lot more complicated than that..

    if i remember right..the redwood incubator gives instructions with their cabinet incubators that are like my vet instructions..the ones that usually dont hatch are the ones that the blastoderm had started organizing itself only to get disorganised in shipping.thats why the fresher the fertile egg the better.p
     

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