De-wattle?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by basicliving, Jun 24, 2008.

  1. basicliving

    basicliving Keepin' the sunny side up

    938
    8
    151
    Mar 20, 2008
    Shenandoah Valley, VA
    I was searching for some info on Silver Gray Dorking roosters (I'll post the question under another topic) on Google and ran across a picture of a Silver Gray Dorking and the description said he had been "de-wattled". I can't find the site again to save my life, but I am really curious. Maybe this rooster had some sort of wattle issue - but I wonder if it was done of purpose? Is there any reason a person would de-wattle a rooster, or any chicken?

    Thanks,
    Penny
     
  2. Wolf-Kim

    Wolf-Kim Chillin' With My Peeps

    3,832
    17
    221
    Jan 25, 2008
    Many people dub(de-comb) and even de-wattle their birds, especially if they live in colder climates. If they get too cold, big wattles and combs can get frostbite. Once they are frostbitten, it can lead to infection and over time just get more complicated for the bird. Dorkings have big combs, I haven't noticed big wattles so far though.

    That's all. They de-wattle for the same reason they dub(de-comb).

    -Kim
     
  3. basicliving

    basicliving Keepin' the sunny side up

    938
    8
    151
    Mar 20, 2008
    Shenandoah Valley, VA
    Thanks, Kim! Now that you mention it, it does seem I remember reading something about removing the comb for that reason somewhere on BYC before. As I recall, this person was from SC - I wish I could find that site again!

    Thanks,
    Penny
     
  4. Chickaroo!

    Chickaroo! Chillin' With My Peeps

    815
    1
    161
    Dec 27, 2007
    I've never heard of that before! How in the world do they do it? Does it hurt the chicken?
     
  5. chickenlady

    chickenlady Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 28, 2007
    Stillwater, NJ
  6. Wolf-Kim

    Wolf-Kim Chillin' With My Peeps

    3,832
    17
    221
    Jan 25, 2008
    Chickaroo! :

    I've never heard of that before! How in the world do they do it? Does it hurt the chicken?

    The website link provided above is probably one of the best places I have found to read up on the subject.

    As for whether it hurts the chicken or not, it would hurt the chicken much more to develop frostbite and an infection and have to cut the wattles and comb off anyway.

    There are ways to prevent frostbite without dubbing and "de-wattling" but they are a little more work. One of them is smearing vaseline on the combs and wattles before it gets really cold.

    -Kim​
     
  7. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    24,442
    49
    371
    May 7, 2007
    Forks, Virginia
    Game bird breeders dub their chickens. It is required for show.

    It actually has its roots in another extremely ugly part of raising game birds. It is a procedure that really makes me very angry.

    The frost bite excuse is a lame one that has been perpetuated far too long. Chickens survive just fine in most climates with their combs and wattles intact. Types of combs and smaller wattles may be better for some extreme weather areas.
     
  8. basicliving

    basicliving Keepin' the sunny side up

    938
    8
    151
    Mar 20, 2008
    Shenandoah Valley, VA
    Do the combs and wattles grow back?
     
  9. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    24,442
    49
    371
    May 7, 2007
    Forks, Virginia
    Quote:No.
     
  10. rooster-red

    rooster-red Here comes the Rooster

    7,008
    21
    261
    Jun 10, 2007
    Douglasville GA
    The function of the comb & wattles are to regulate body temp by putting more blood closer to the skin surface to cool it faster.

    I will not dub.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by