Death of young birds

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by mnahas491112, Jan 10, 2010.

  1. mnahas491112

    mnahas491112 New Egg

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    Jan 10, 2010
    I bought 4 nine week old Seabright chicks a few weeks ago. I have about 30 hens in the coop. The chicks have been fine for two weeks and in the last 4 days I have lost 3 of them. They were healthy in the afternoon and dead at night. Could the hens be attacking the chicks and killing them? I live in CT. and have put a low light in the coop to give some warmth to the young birds. Please give me your opinion on what is happening.
     
  2. chickerdoodle

    chickerdoodle Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 21, 2009
    Oregon
    I am a newbie myself so I cannot be certain. I believe a lot more info would help more experienced folks.

    Did you examine them carefully for injuries?

    Are they getting enough to eat and water to drink? The big hens may be keeping them from the food. Check their crops at night to see if they are full. If not put at least a few feeders and a spare water container in different areas or you can separate the little ones at least twice a day for a half hour or so with food/water for them to eat.

    Another thing that came to mind is that Seabrights are more susceptible to Mareks disease and it shows up more often with stress (new home). Were they acting 100% normal the entire time you had them?

    Third, are their stools normal? Parasites (worms) and protozoa (cocci) can be a problem if they were not exposed prior to dirt even if given medicated chick feed.

    Fourth--are you feeding layer feed to them? At this young age it can be detrimental to their kidneys to feed layer feed as it has too much calcium..
     
  3. jeslewmazer

    jeslewmazer Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 24, 2009
    Mississippi
    If they were being attacked I think you would have noticed before 2 weeks. I don't know anything about Seabrights. chickerdoodle stated some very good questions. But some Parasites are hard to detect. My chickens get wormy and show no signs in their poop they just start getting then and eat more with no prevail. Mites live on the skin and feathers and can take down any size chicken with enough of them (tiny little buggers)
     
  4. chickenzoo

    chickenzoo Emu Hugger

    Coccidia is often a concern with younger birds, especially when housed with older birds that have built up an immunity to it. Also Older birds will run younger birds off the food and water and keep them from getting any. I would separate them immediately and offer them ample food and water with vitamins. If they eat like mad but still lose weight then I would dose with Corid (or do it either way) as it is pretty safe. Other worms and lice/mites should be checked also...... Best Wishes
     
  5. Redfarrah

    Redfarrah Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 7, 2009
    Rocky Mount
    Chickerdoodle Thanks for the wonderful information !

    You may have just saved what's left of my new additions.
    I brought home 6 younger chickens a few weeks ago
    Introduced them to older chickens when this freeze-a-thon started.
    They have all been living in the inside cage for a little over a week.

    One died last night after acting "slow" and stressed yesterday.
    He/she was the littlest of all the chicks I introduced and I noticed it
    wasn't fighting back against the older birds
    pecking, and was hiding out under the hanging food dispenser.

    I quarntined the little chicken, It was then I noticed it wasn't upset
    about being alone, most chicks this age screech non stop if you put them alone
    I gave it plenty of food and water but it died anyway. [​IMG]

    I have been feeding ALL the chickens layer crumbles as my older birds should lay at
    any time. Leaving for the feed store right now for medicated chick feed.
    My other little chickens are acting OK for now, I hope it's not too late.
     
  6. theFox

    theFox Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 21, 2009
    Standish, Maine
    "I have been feeding ALL the chickens layer crumbles as my older birds should lay at
    any time. Leaving for the feed store right now for medicated chick feed.
    My other little chickens are acting OK for now, I hope it's not too late."

    Oops, not really a good idea. Layer rations after they start laying and your newest members are a long way from laying.

    The added calcium in layer rations is hard on kidneys, the only reason it doesn't do in layers is that they use up the calcium making eggshells.

    Non laying pullets and roosters can wind up down for the count as they have no way to flush the excess calcium except through their kidneys.

    How long was your quarantine period?
     
  7. chickerdoodle

    chickerdoodle Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 21, 2009
    Oregon
    Quote:I also hope this will save the little ones too! [​IMG] It very well may be their kidneys failing.
    I don't know if they need medicated or non medicated chick feed or grower (I am not too knowledgeable about Banty chickens) but certainly NO layer feed yet!

    Were their crops full at night? Were their weights normal for their age? It could be more than one thing going on.
    Sending lots of good thoughts your way so keep us posted. [​IMG]
     
  8. Redfarrah

    Redfarrah Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 7, 2009
    Rocky Mount
    Fox: the quarantine period was < one day, it was fine when i went to bed saturday night, slow and sluggish sunday morning laying down but responsive sunday night, dead monday morning.

    Chickerdoodle I don't know how to check a crop for fullness unless it's to look at them and see if they look full.
    I opted for medicated feed because they are in a cage with older birds. Everyone is happily munching the starter feed as I type this.

    Also I looked at the labels from each of the feed bags:

    The layena brand layer crumble has 3.25- 4.25 % max calcium (50#)
    VS
    the Purina start and grow of just o.75 1.25% max calcium (50#)

    This could explain why the chickens feel better when they get outside to peck and scratch, Could the scratch they get from outside help get rid of some of the extra calcium?

    Tries to remember who told me layer food was ok @ 10 + weeks of age. (think it was mr. bad attitude @ the feed store man) [​IMG]
     
  9. theFox

    theFox Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 21, 2009
    Standish, Maine
    Time will eventually get rid of the excess calcium.



    Your quarantine period was too short and it is too late now.

    Next time try 30 days which is about the minimum for things to really show up in the new birds.

    Also you need to take into account that the new comers need time to adjust to any new feed, changes in water, and the local organisms in the ground at their new home.

    It is possible that they may be free of things that can cause your existing flock problems, however they need slow acclimation to any conditions your flock may have.

    Slow and easy usually wins, fast frequently kills.
     
  10. Redfarrah

    Redfarrah Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 7, 2009
    Rocky Mount
    Fox think i answered wrong....
    I thought the quarantine you asked for was after the sick one was noticed sick..

    The new chickens spent almost 2 weeks in the indoor cage before I brought the big chickens inside,
    I was shooting for 3 weeks of new addition quarantine, but this cold thing stopped it.
    They had also spent some time in outdoor run together with big chickens, with me supervising the action.
    So they all knew each other, and everything was dandy until they all shared a small space..

    Somethings for me to remember, and hard learned lessons too...
    NO layer feed until they lay.
    Plenty of space per bird.
    If a chicken is hiding there's something wrong.

    Thanks for the input !
     

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