Decipher my necropsy report

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by sunnypooh, Aug 28, 2014.

  1. sunnypooh

    sunnypooh Out Of The Brooder

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    Hi,

    We had a hen die on us recently and sent the poor thing to UC Davis to be necropsied. The results came back today and I can decipher bits and pieces of it, but unsure if any of the diseases are contagious for my other hens.

    Here's the report.

    1. Coelomitis, lymphohistiocytic with yolk protein; Proteus isolated.
    2. Tracheitis, mild to moderate, diffuse lymphocytic. 3. Pneumoconiosis, moderate, multifocal 4. Fibrinous air sacculitis, lymphohistiocytic and granulocytic
    5. Tubulointerstitial nephritis lymphocytic with multifocal mineral concretions.
    Ancillary test results:
    a. Proteus isolated from the coelom, liver and lung.
    b. Negative for avian influenza and enteric Salmonella by PCR.
    Ca s e S u m m a r y
    08-28-14. This chicken had a coelomitis with free yolk protein throughout the abdomen. This likely started as an anscending infection of the oviduct. The Proteus may have been the primary bacteria but also may be contaminant and overgrew the primary bacteria. In addition, there was a tracheitis which may suggest there was an upper respiratory infection. Several agents can cause that including Mycoplasma, paramyxovirus or infectious bronchitis virus. Avian influenza and intestinal Salmonella PCR test results were negative. This completes testing on this case.

    G ro s s O b s e r v a t i o n s
    This hen is submitted in fair postmortem condition. She is thin. There is dirt and seeds in the crop. The oropharynx is unremarkable. The trachea is clear. The lungs are pink. The abdominal air sacs are opaque and there is
    Report 4.19-CAHFS Standard Report - 8/19/2014
    Page 1 of 2
    CAHFS Final Version 1 Accession # D1410350 August 28, 2014
    brown thick fluid with yolk material in the coelomic cavity. The heart, liver, spleen, kidneys are unremarkable except for slightly swollen. The intestines are unremarkable. There is no bursa grossly present.
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    I am an amateur, but it looks like she died of egg yolk peritonitis, and also had some kidney disease, and a respiratory disease which could include mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) or a virus.
     
  3. sunnypooh

    sunnypooh Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks! I am hoping the respiratory disease is gone and not in the flock.
     
  4. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    Ditto what Eggcessive said. And I think it would be unlikely for there to be only one bird in a flock affected by whatever respiratory disease she had. Sometimes they are carriers and may show only very slight symptoms that we don't even notice. All you can do is keep an eye on them.
     
  5. sunnypooh

    sunnypooh Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks. We keep looking but hard to tell with the warmer weather if they're relaxed or if they're tired and listless.
     
  6. Nambroth

    Nambroth Fud Lady

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    I also agree with egg yolk peritonitis(or similar reproductive issue such as acute ovarian tumors) + respiratory disease. How old was the hen? The EYP might have weakened her enough that the latent respiratory disease 'flared up' so to speak. Either way, it would be good to carefully watch your flock as they are very likely carrying any respiratory disease that your hen had. They may be immune with the disease in latency (remission) so they may be just fine. It is just something to keep in mind! Stress and other disease will often "bring out" any hidden problems.
     
  7. sunnypooh

    sunnypooh Out Of The Brooder

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    I've had her a little over two years. I don't know how long her previous owners had her for. She was laying when I got her and shr went through a molt last fall.
     
  8. Nambroth

    Nambroth Fud Lady

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    Yes, she was (sadly) at an age that peritonitis and other reproductive issues tend to be the death of production hens and other breeds that have been bred for a high number of eggs. I'm sorry for your loss.
     
  9. sunnypooh

    sunnypooh Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks. I'd like to think she went painlessly. I didn't realize then the breed affects the likelihood for this issue.
     

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