Deep Litter Method

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by vinwright, Jan 27, 2009.

  1. vinwright

    vinwright Hatching

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    Hi, can anyone please tell me if I can use oak shavings rather than pine shavings for the deep litter method in the coop?

    Many thanks, Vin
     
  2. Wifezilla

    Wifezilla Positively Ducky

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    I wouldn't think oak wouldn't be an issue. I know some people are concerned about the natural resins in cedar, but oak? I would try it.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2009
  3. Comet Mum

    Comet Mum In the Brooder

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    First, [​IMG]

    I am rather new here too, so certainly you should listen to more experienced voices. I have only heard bad things about cedar due to the volatile oils. (Even then some folks use cedar.) I think oak shavings would be fine as long as they are dry and haven't become moldy.

    This is a great site, so enjoy!
     
  4. vinwright

    vinwright Hatching

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    Many thanks for that, the shavings are actually mixed but mostly oak and are dry.

    Oak is used a lot here in France and there are quite a few trees lying around after the terrible storm we suffered on Saturday!

    Salut - Vin, Moncorneil Grazan, Gers, France
     
  5. horsejody

    horsejody Squeaky Wheel

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    I'm not sure about chickens, but eating oak shavings can have a toxic effect on horses. I would look into it. I think there was a lengthy discussion on this at least once before.
     
  6. vinwright

    vinwright Hatching

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    I would hope my chickens wouldn't eat the shavings but will keep an eye on things. Many thanks for the warning.
     
  7. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    I've never heard of horses having a problem with *oak* shavings, it's *walnut* (and butternut) that's the problem.

    The usual knock against hardwood shavings, such as oak, is the greater tendency to mold as compared to spruce/pine/fir shavings. Some people keep chickens on hardwood shavings without problems. I expect it depends mostly on how dry your coop will stay (and how well-stirred your bedding will stay), and somewhat on how extremely paranoid you are [​IMG]

    If I had a free source of relatively dustfree hardwood (nonwalnut) shavings, and a pretty dry coop, I might be inclined to try it myself. Wouldn't actually *recommend* it to others, though, you know?

    Have fun, good luck,

    Pat
     
  8. horsejody

    horsejody Squeaky Wheel

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    Quote:This is a quote from www.thehorse.com article concerning bedding:

    "Soft woods like pine and fir make good bedding, but hardwoods are less absorbent. "Some hardwoods don't make good bedding unless they're ground up as sawdust, and some--especially black walnut--can be toxic to horses," says Scott.

    Oak might have too much acid. An alkaloid found in yellow poplar can cause itching, although other members of the poplar family are safe for bedding. Cedar might not work; even though it smells good and inhibits insects, some horses develop allergic reactions to the oils in cedar products, says Scott. Make sure wood has not been treated with chemicals or preservatives that might irritate the skin. Wood shavings can be dusty and might need to be lightly watered with fine spray from a hose. Shavings compress and pack down with the weight of the horse, so you'll need to add extra bedding to compensate."

    This is also mentioned on www.bloodhorse.com

    I have heard of oak causing skin irritation in horses. I don't know if it would irritate a chicken.
     

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