deep litter method

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by nellynelly, Jan 13, 2014.

  1. nellynelly

    nellynelly Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 8, 2012
    Bogota, Col
    how long can i keep adding material. it has been 1.5 years now, no smell, any issues with a deep deep litter?
     
  2. Daisy8s

    Daisy8s Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 12, 2011
    Central Michigan
    Wow, you must have a lot of depth in the coop if you can go that long. By the end of one year my litter is 18-24 inches deep and the birds are stooping to get under the bottom perch.

    I clean mine out in the spring to put on my garden as wonderful mulch/fertilizer.

    I also think it's healthier for the wood walls of the coop if they get to dry out for several months rather than having litter against them year-round. That's the only issue I can think of regarding long-term deep litter, though.
     
  3. BillM2

    BillM2 Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 16, 2010
    Mid-Hudson Valley
    Can you use the DLM with concrete floors? I've been piling up the pine shavings but remove around 50% every couple of weeks because it gets smelly. I sprinkle in pelletized lime and diatamaceous earth but it gets rather stinky after a couple of weeks. Thoughts on this?
     
  4. nellynelly

    nellynelly Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 8, 2012
    Bogota, Col
    the coop is 8-10' tall, so i have plenty of room for the litter to accumulate. i have not noticed any moisture buildup.
     
  5. Daisy8s

    Daisy8s Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 12, 2011
    Central Michigan
    I had the stinkiest and slimiest litter the one time I used DE in my litter. Never again! The DE killed off all the healthy organisms that create a composting action. If you have a bad smell then you're not getting a composting action happening.

    i began my deep litter with 3-4 inches of well-rotted material from a 2 yr old compost pile to bring in those healthy organisms. Then, when I clean out the coop I always leave a couple inches to keep those organisms in my coop bedding and I'm sure to turn the bedding every few weeks.

    Yes, you can certainly do it on concrete--that'd be better than wood which would certainly rot. (My coop is on dirt/gravel, which is great for drainage of any excess moisture.)
     

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