denegard, baytril or tylan?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by poonam, Jul 15, 2011.

  1. poonam

    poonam Out Of The Brooder

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    Hi folks,

    Another post about my chickens with respiratory issues. Sneezing, coughing, and swollen sinuses are the most common symptoms. One of my chicks with a swollen sinus had been treated with doxycycline, but passed away last night. nasal flushing, hot compress, antibiotic eye/nose drops or doxycycline could not get her infection down.

    trying to save my others. Our vet did a swab and fecal, and two weeks later, the results are still not in. Part of the results are, and they specify no basic bacterial infection (though mycoplasma is not easy to cullture, so they don't know for sure that is out). We send out little one's body for a necropsy, but results won't be in for 2 weeks.

    meanwhile, I have tylan at home, and am considering ordering denegard. Cannot afford the vet anymore, and they really don't have experience with chickens.

    My guess is Mycoplasma G. or Infectious coryza. It could also be a virus, i guess, in which case it would be untreatable.

    Thoughts on whether Denegard or tylan would be a better option? or is baytril (pres. only) really the only way to go?

    i've read a ton of good things about denegard on this forum but really am looking for advice from folks with similar issues for whom denegard has worked, as i'm leaning towards that one. (or tylan, which i have at home now).

    Thank you in advance.
     
  2. SpeckledHills

    SpeckledHills Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Just saw this post--I'm sorry you didn't get any feedback earlier. What did you decide to use? How did it go?

    I haven't used Denagard, but would like to try it sometime on CRD and watch its effects.

    I've been giving some Baytril recently and have made a "Baytril for Birds" page on the site linked in my sig below of info I've learned, if that'd be useful to you or anyone else looking for Baytril info.

    Please do post how your recent treatments went! Share your experience!
     
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  3. seminolewind

    seminolewind Flock Mistress Premium Member

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    That's a great site for info. I'm glad you have it.
     
  4. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Posted my response below your "Thank you in advance." Sorry about that.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2012
  5. SpeckledHills

    SpeckledHills Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG] Keep in mind that if you choose Baytril, you are supposed to NEVER EVER eat ANY eggs or meat from those chickens in the future.

    This doesn't have to do with withdrawal time! (Baytril's isn't long--only 5 days).

    It is because the chickens' bodies may afterwards foster some dangerously resistant bacteria for the rest of their lives [​IMG], and you might get those bacteria in you & possibly be vulnerable to future illness. There's more info linked from my "Baytril for Birds" page if you want to know more on that.

    I still chose to use Baytril for 3 of my birds that are pets & that I'd like to possibly breed.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2012
    1 person likes this.
  6. SpeckledHills

    SpeckledHills Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you so much! I'm glad I can offer some help to other chicken people, and I appreciate your encouragement. [​IMG]

    I also hope some day I can upgrade the navigation & other technology so it can become more efficient for people to use...
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2012
    1 person likes this.
  7. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Baytril egg withdrawal is 28 days.
    http://poultrykeeper.com/poultry-me...ytril-used-to-treat-respiratory-problems.html
     
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  8. SpeckledHills

    SpeckledHills Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That site has some VITAL info on Baytril wrong, I'm seeing, so I'm glad you brought out that link! I just emailed that site the following & hope they'll correct that page so they don't communicate dangerous false info any more.

    In research I was doing, I came across some articles that give info on Baytril that is different than what's listed on this site's page on Baytril. They have important consequences, so am wondering if you might revise the info?

    Baytril withdrawal time if the medicine is given orally is 5 days until it is no longer found to be present in eggs or meat.
    http://idosi.org/gv/gv3(5)09/2.pdf
    However, eggs or meat from treated chickens are NEVER supposed to be eaten after Baytril is used.

    Baytril was banned in the US from use in meat or egg producing poultry because of the PERMANENT serious possible dangers.
    http://evolution.berkeley.edu/evolibrary/news/050915_baytril

    Hopefully vets aren't saying 28 days nor assuring that eggs or meat from treated chickens will EVER be safe for eating.

    I only noticed that specific inaccuracy (because it's SO important & I recently learned it myself), but it may be worth checking & verifying the rest of the info listed, also.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2012
  9. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Thanks for your link. Five days is better than 28 days for those who use baytril!
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2012
  10. gjensen

    gjensen Overrun With Chickens

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    If your concerns are the same mentioned in the link then you should not use the drug at all. Eating the produce is not the only concern listed, but also the over use of it. Whether or not you eat the animal products is irrelevant when the concern is "creating" resistant bacteria. The use is what potentially creates resistant strains, not the eating. Bacteria is shed with the feces. Coming into contact with the said bacteria is unavoidable.
    I am not making a judgment on the use of this drug or others. Everyone has different circumstances and goals. The products are also legal, so the choice is yours. It is not my business what anyone does. My business isn't anyone else's either. What I am saying is if the creating of drug resistant strains is the concern, then the use of it shouldn't be an option. You will not be able to avoid coming into contact with the supposed resistant bacteria. Even if you don't eat the eggs.
    It is my opinion that perpetuating disease in a flock is not in anyone's best interest. If our options to deal with it is unable to rid the bird of it, then perpetuating the disease is what we are doing. We are effectively making our own resistant strain. I do not want a resistant strain of anything next door to me. The only thing I would prefer to have resistant is my birds themselves.
    If Deneguard is at is supposed to be, an option that the bacteria does not build a resistance to, then it is an option. Maybe not for the breeder who might choose to select for birds naturally able to resist it's local threats, but someone that keeps a small flock of hens. It's use may mask an unseen problem that the birds are good at hiding anyways.
    These are just thoughts and opinions. Take it how you choose to. I have some settling to do on this issue myself.
     
    1 person likes this.

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