Depth of sand in run.

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Huskeriowa, Apr 10, 2011.

  1. Huskeriowa

    Huskeriowa Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My Coop
    Hi all,

    I have read the posts concerning sand in runs but I am looking for a definitive answer for my project. My run is built on a hill so I have basically had to build a retaining wall as a box to hold the aggregate in it and level the grade of the slope. Yesterday I used a wheelbarrow and a shovel to move five and a half tons of pea gravel. That doesn't sound like much until you realize that is 11,000 lbs moved by hand. I am totally spent today and thinking of ordering sand to fill the rest of the box is depressing.

    I was planning on adding 8 inches of sand which is another 5 tons. Sand is not as easy to move as pea gravel is. So, I am thinking about reducing the depth of sand in the run. Given that some sand will settle into the voids of the pea grave, what is the depth of sand that I should have so that I do not have any regrets in the future? I don't want to over do it because of my laziness but then again I don't want to put too little sand in and have regrets later.

    Any input is appreciated. Thanks
     
  2. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    First, having moved a looooot of tons of aggregate by hand (wheelbarrow) around my horse sheds, you have my complete sympathies and I am impressed you got that much done in one day! [​IMG]

    I mean, the sand and pea gravel are going to end up all mixed together anyhow, right? (Not sure why you're using both but I'm sure there's a good reason). Why not just put in as much sand as you can stand to deal with, for now, and then if you want more later, put more in later? Either have it all delivered now if you have room for a big ol' pile o' sand sitting there for some months; or just get some now and then if you want more later get it then.

    It's not a huge deal, the chickens can use it either way [​IMG]

    Good luck, "have fun" [​IMG],

    Pat
     
  3. Huskeriowa

    Huskeriowa Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 19, 2010
    Iowa
    My Coop
    Thanks for the reply Pat. The reason I used pea gravel for the first course is simply because of the location of the run. I cant get a bobcat in there to easily place the aggregate. So, I am essentially pushing and pulling the pea gravel 24' from one end of the run to the other end. Because pea gravel is 'rounder', it pushes more easily. The sand will be heavier and not as easy to move from one end of the run to the other that is why I am not looking forward to it. Additionally... I have the posts set that the fence is to be attached to. Once I attach the fence to the post I will lose the ability to use the wheelbarrow so I want to get it right to begin with.

    Odd situation I guess but it seems most people have their own unique issues when it comes to building the run or coop.
     
  4. Judy

    Judy Chicken Obsessed Staff Member Premium Member

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    You might want to rethink making it so it won't be accessible with a wheelbarrow. Maybe a wider gate?
     

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