Design recommendations for coop using 38" pallets

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Earthlark, Oct 13, 2019.

  1. Earthlark

    Earthlark In the Brooder

    12
    19
    34
    Feb 7, 2019
    Roseville, MN
    I have a few hundred of these 38"x38" pallets. I need to build a coop for about 8 birds within the next couple weeks (tho I'll probably only have 6 by then). Chickens currently roosting in tree, but with Minnesota winter coming on, I need to give them a bit more shelter.

    1a) I'd love to use the pallets without taking them apart, but then I'd need to find some way to fill in the crevices between pallet boards since I imagine that would make the coop fairly drafty. Recommendations?

    1b) Since pallets are 38" I'm thinking a 6'4"x6'4" or 6'4"x9'6" coop. (Not using standard dimensions will make it more of a pain I guess... :rolleyes: )

    2) I could take the pallets apart and use the boards as shingles, though this would be a lot more work as boards have staples I'd have to remove.

    The sketchup below is what I'm thinking. Any obvious changes needed, e.g. supports to add, etc?

    To get an idea of what these pallets look like, I've included photos below of a quaiviary (...for quail) and temporary chick housing I built out of these pallets. (Note, I'm an amateur, so don't know proper building techniques.)


    Quaiviary unfinished.jpg Quaiviary.jpg Boards.jpg Coop Blueprint.jpg
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2019
  2. FortCluck

    FortCluck Crowing

    2,966
    11,441
    486
    Sep 9, 2019
    Central Virginia
    My husband built this coop using all free materials from friends and their businesses. He used 2x4s to make a frame and slid all the pallets on. We have insulation that we are putting on the inside in slots, it's so nice. I love it so much. It's a walk in too.

    IMG_20191013_113502.jpg
     
  3. Earthlark

    Earthlark In the Brooder

    12
    19
    34
    Feb 7, 2019
    Roseville, MN
    @FortCluck Great example. Thanks! That's kind of what I was thinking.

    What kind of insulation? Will it be covered on the inside? I've read a few things about chickens eating/tearing up the insulation. (I do have a bunch of drywall pieces I could use on the inside to reduce drafts, but guessing that wouldn't be so good because of moisture issues...)
     
  4. FortCluck

    FortCluck Crowing

    2,966
    11,441
    486
    Sep 9, 2019
    Central Virginia
    It's fanfold insulation sheets, they won't chew through it because it'll look like the wall. The pallets have wood slats that keep them out of it.
     
  5. Compost King

    Compost King Free Ranging

    2,406
    7,882
    577
    Apr 19, 2018
    Salisbury, North Carolina
    I found using 2x3's makes sliding pallets on much easier, and they cost less.
     
  6. FortCluck

    FortCluck Crowing

    2,966
    11,441
    486
    Sep 9, 2019
    Central Virginia
    These are not regular pallets they're for a specific shingle brand... The 2x4s worked perfect and the coop is super solid
     
  7. Compost King

    Compost King Free Ranging

    2,406
    7,882
    577
    Apr 19, 2018
    Salisbury, North Carolina
    I would use3 2x4's in that situation too. Regular pallets I found that using 2x3's fit perfectly.
     
  8. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

    68,198
    64,738
    1,477
    Nov 27, 2012
    SW Michigan
    My Coop
    Did you take any pics while building this?
    Sure would be nice to see those.
    ...and more of the coop, inside and out...is there a human door?
     
  9. FortCluck

    FortCluck Crowing

    2,966
    11,441
    486
    Sep 9, 2019
    Central Virginia
    Yes there is a walk in door on the side
     
  10. sorce

    sorce Songster

    145
    312
    126
    Aug 26, 2019
    The legs are rather thin huh?

    I would invest in or rent a proper pneumatic nail gun.

    Using them back to back and overlapped to cover the cracks would be righteous.

    I'd skip a design and just get to blowing nails, putting proper design time into door and window frames.

    Sorce
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by: