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Deworm with Rumatel (Morantel Tartrate) Dumor Goat Dewormer?

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by MaryZoe, May 16, 2018.

  1. MaryZoe

    MaryZoe Songster

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    Has anyone except me ever used DuMor Goat Dewormer on their chickens? I tried it first in my stag pen with my roosters, and it seemed to work so well that I thought I'd try it on a couple of my ladies who showed signs of worms. Apparently there is no withdrawl period for goats--any suggestions about chickens? I have the ladies separated and I am not eating their eggs, but I was wondering whether others have tried this remedy, and how it worked for them? The nice thing is that they are pellets that the flock gobbles up, just like their own pellets. It's quite simple to get them to eat it (unlike some of the other remedies). Of course it's hard to tell who ate how much, but it's also supposed to be hard to exceed the recommended dosage. Thoughts? Thanks!
     
    ronott1 likes this.
  2. Folly's place

    Folly's place Free Ranging 7 Years

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    If it's not labeled for chickens, it's not approved, so don't use it! If your birds have worms, only fenbendazole is approved for laying hens, and it is effective.
    Many products work well; that's not the issue. It's about residuals in the eggs, which can be for a very long time. Look up at the FARAD.org site for approved safe products for chickens.
    Mary
     
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  3. MaryZoe

    MaryZoe Songster

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    It's interesting you say that. Many people I know use all sorts of dewormers that are made for animals other than hens. In the case of the DuMor, I wonder why, if there is no withdrawal period at all even for goat's milk, we would worry that there might be residual effects in eggs. I guess it could be an issue, but it seems that if it's not going to affect milk even the day it was ingested, it should not affect eggs. But it is certainly true that it might not be worth the risk. I intended to wait the two weeks that is suggested for most medications. I hope that suffices....
     
  4. aligarysmom

    aligarysmom Chirping

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    Milk is different as it is produced by excretion cells. It’s like a filter and specific things can be checked not to cross that membrane. Eggs are formed and produced in a duct. I can see that not being filtered. The processes are different and so it could be in one and not the other.
     
  5. Folly's place

    Folly's place Free Ranging 7 Years

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    Each hen has all the egg yolks she will ever have, and each yolk absorbs substances that she eats or is exposed to; some things will be in those yolks for a long time in small quantities, and that's the issue.
    Milk isn't produced the same way at all, so different rules apply.
    Many products approved for use in pets aren't okay for food animals.
    Mary
     
  6. ronott1

    ronott1 A chicken will always remember the egg Premium Member Project Manager 7 Years

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  7. MaryZoe

    MaryZoe Songster

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    Thanks again for this information. I did look up the FARAD.org site, but I could not find anything specific about fenbendazole and its withdrawal time. Nor could I find anything about Piperazine (in Wazine), which is approved for meat chickens though apparently not for egg-laying hens. FARAD has an option to submit special requests, but they require you to submit veterinary information, which I am not sure I want to submit, since this request comes from me, not my vet. But after some digging around, I found an interesting article that was published in the FARAD Digest that specifies withdrawal periods for a variety of meds used on chickens. Interestingly enough, in the US fenbendazole is NOT approved for laying hens, though it is approved in the UK. In addition, Piperazine (Wazine) is not approved in the US or in the UK for egg-laying hens, but it is approved in Australia and Canada. So pick your country to decide which dewormer is the best option.

    Apparently the reason that these meds are not approved in the US is that in order for any medication to be approved for laying hens in the US, it must have a zero day withdrawal period. And that's hard to get. Soo...

    Thanks for the FARAD info. :)

    www.farad.org/publications/digests/122015EggResidue.pdf
     
  8. Folly's place

    Folly's place Free Ranging 7 Years

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    Fenbendazole is approved, as Aquazole (sp?) which is a water soluble product that's hard to find and expensive. Piperazine used to be approved, but not any more.
    Research is done as money comes available, and there's nearly none in the small flock segment of poultry keeping. Large commercial enterprises keep chickens for a year or less, in more controlled conditions, and have few issues with intestinal worms, so no funding.
    Mary
     
  9. MaryZoe

    MaryZoe Songster

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    Yes, I just found the FARAD article that suggests that Fenbendazole is now approved for laying hens. It appears that Fenbendazole is the active ingredient in product in Safe Guard AquaSol. Here's the link. http://www.farad.org/vetgram/layers.asp
    I suppose that the research paper I referred to earlier is outdated. Although the approval of the drugs is outdated, the information about how and why medications can affect chickens' eggs for a long time is interesting and relevant to any backyard chicken keeper who needs to give any sorts of medicines to their flock. I highly recommend it.
     
  10. MaryZoe

    MaryZoe Songster

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    If fendendazole is approved for chix, I wonder why SafeGuard does not make a product for chickens? Which SafeGuard is preferable for chickens, goat, equine, or cattle? My chickens seem to hate the flavor of the SafeGuard paste for goats--and like any other chickens, they'll eat almost anything else. Other suggestions?
     

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