Dewormer we use for geese (and ducks and chickens too) & dosage

Discussion in 'Geese' started by CelticOaksFarm, Aug 28, 2012.

  1. CelticOaksFarm

    CelticOaksFarm Family owned, family run

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    I am a NOT a vet, always consult your vet before giving any medication.

    Below is what WE use here with all of our birds. I will not give a schedule for giving during the year as each persons climate and conditions are different.

    ALWAYS have a fecal test run to know what you are dealing with.





    1.) 1/2 cc of the liquid topically on the skin for an adult chicken.
    2.) 1 cc. for adult geese, put it between their wings.
    when dosing think of it like applying frontline on a dog

    ALWAYS have your vet check a fecal sample to see what kind of worms they have if any first.
    No sense in deworming if there are no parasites present.

     
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  2. Narragansett

    Narragansett Songster

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    That dose is too high. The correct dose is the same as on the bottle for other species, which breaks down to be 0.1 ml per 11 pounds, 10 being close enough. 1 ml treats 111 pounds.
     
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  3. CelticOaksFarm

    CelticOaksFarm Family owned, family run

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    That dose is what our vet recommends, will stick with what dosage she says to use.

    please reread and note it is topical, not oral. Oral dosage is done at a different rate, we do not do oral dosage
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2012
  4. Iain Utah

    Iain Utah Crowing

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    I will chime in as well, since I have dealt with roundworms in my rescued geese. I am a big believer in fecal testing prior to giving wormer. It is easy... collect some poop, take to your nearest vet (dog/cat works great). Testing usually costs about $25. For roundworms, the recommended wormer is injectible cattle ivermectin, available at any feed store. However, this is not effective on all types of worms, which is why the fecal test is important. My vet had me give .1 cc per 10lbs and administer orally in a syringe, but you must be careful to squirt liquid deep into mouth so as to not accidentally get it into their lungs.

    FYI, a bird that is heavily infested with worms will eat food like they are starving, but will lose weight and be generally weaker.
     
  5. CelticOaksFarm

    CelticOaksFarm Family owned, family run

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    yep yup, and is why I dont offer oral dosages because too many dont know how to give waterfowl oral meds.

    NOTE that oral is much less than topical

    [​IMG] Hi Iain nice to see you got home safe and sound
     
  6. Iain Utah

    Iain Utah Crowing

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    Hey Celtic! [​IMG] Thanks, it's good to be home, if only for a few days.
     
  7. Cottage Rose

    Cottage Rose Songster

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    Tip: take poo samples from a variety of your birds and squish it together in a small baggie, take to your vet for one fecal floatation test/one very reasonable fee.
    You need not take samples from all your birds but your whole flock should be treated if parasites are found per your vets instructions with the correct chemical class.
    The shotgun method for deworming with Ivermectin may get some parasites but not all...such as Hookworms which need to be treated with Panacur so ideally make
    sure to get your flock tested at least once a year. Hope this helps.
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2012
  8. CelticOaksFarm

    CelticOaksFarm Family owned, family run

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    Hey Vicky, always helpful to have your thoughts as well.
     
  9. Narragansett

    Narragansett Songster

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    Your vet needs to do some research and check with avian veterinarians who have been prescribing this for years.

    Or maybe you just misunderstood something along the way. The dose is the dose, irregardless of how it is adminstered. The correct dose for the 1% ivermectin is as I have written, and that's what you have said that you are using. Now there are other formulations that are used topically, which are about half as strong as the 1% injectible, but the correct dose for those is still much less than what you are using. The 0.27% swine injectible works out closer to the dose that you are using, if you were to use that topically.
     
  10. jdywntr

    jdywntr Songster

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    Just wondering if anyone just uses food grade DE as a wormer or as a preventative. I picked some up at TSC to use for the fire ants in the birds fenced off areas and I give it to my dogs daily since 2 of them have found that wild rabbit poo is delicious [​IMG] There are directions on the bag for basically all barnyard animals.

    I do add it to the birds feed but not on a regular basis though I may when my month old chicks start to free range when they are older.
     

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