Diamotaceous Earth & Reduced Egg Laying

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by crazypolishchic, Oct 9, 2012.

  1. crazypolishchic

    crazypolishchic Out Of The Brooder

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    About two weeks ago I started adding Diamotaceous Earth to the feed for my hens as well as sprinkling it in the chicken yard and the nesting boxes under the pine shavings. This last week I have gotten about half the number of eggs that I normally get. I am wondering if this has anything to do with the D.E. or if it is just due to the shortening of days even though the temps are still high here in N. Florida.

    Has anyone experienced a reduction in egg laying due to Diamotaceous Earth?
     
  2. ChickensAreSweet

    ChickensAreSweet Heavenly Grains for Hens

    No, I have added DE to the feed before and never experienced that. Make sure you are only adding a tiny amount. It is good to keep the feed dry but folks say it doesn't work as a wormer since it gets wet. I don't give it anymore.

    Make sure it is food-grade!
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2012
  3. ChickensRDinos

    ChickensRDinos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    x2 the only negative effect it can have is to dehydrate the birds. Take a look at their poo and make sure it isn't too dry and hard. You only want to add a little. I would guess it is more seasonal egg issues.
     
  4. tropicaljo

    tropicaljo Out Of The Brooder

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    DE works to kill parasites and other bugs whether it's wet or dry.
     
  5. ChickensRDinos

    ChickensRDinos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It will NOT always kill internal parasites like tape worm, round worm, etc.

    Food grade DE will only kill external bugs. It is great for preventing mites, lice, flies, fleas, etc. It works best on insects with exoskeletons - it pulls out moisture, killing those bugs (which is why it can cause dehydration when over consumed). It can kill external worms and slugs, but not nearly as consistently as the crunchy bugs.

    There is a medical grade DE that is used by some vets/doctors to treat internal worms but even this is only partially effective and usually combined with other treatments. Food grade DE is not an effective home dewormer.

    DE is a great product but should really just be considered an external preventative pesticide.
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2012
  6. flirty31

    flirty31 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Isn't it dangerous to use DE?

    I don't understand why it would be added to food, should I be doing this too?
     
  7. ChickensRDinos

    ChickensRDinos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    A lot of people think that it will prevent parasites but the science does not consistently support this. It can kill them if conditions are right but is not consistent or effective enough to be considered a great choice.

    I have also read that feeding it to your pets can decrease the fly factor around poop. I have done this in the past but have stopped.

    It is non-toxic (because it's effects are physical not chemical) so if you or your dog or your chickens or anyone eats it the only side effect could be dehydration. (It is a very fine powder so not good to breath in)

    So, it's not dangerous. You can feed it to them and most people do so to prevent parasites. If you are interested I would do some research and decide for yourself if you think its a good route. I personally would recommend other deworming options if you are concerned about this issue.
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2012
  8. sumi

    sumi Égalité Staff Member

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  9. ChickensAreSweet

    ChickensAreSweet Heavenly Grains for Hens

    Pumpkin seeds are reported to help a little with prevention of worms (not treatment of an infestation) I hear. Some on BYC have stated that it helps some. Only thing is they aren't crazy about them...will eat them a little.

    Yes there are many many threads on valbazen. Also safeguard (all wormers except wazine are off-label for chickens and even wazine isn't approved for layers). Toss eggs appropriately after wormers, two weeks is what a lot of people do according to what I have read on BYC.

    You might try adding some artificial light if you can do so safely in the coop in the morning and in evenings to increase your laying if desired. 14 hours a day is what a lot of folks go with.
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2012
  10. ChickensRDinos

    ChickensRDinos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    same here! I feel like my chickens are picky lol. They are not the little vacuum cleaners I imagined they would be.
     

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