Diatomaceous earth and health

Ol Grey Mare

One egg shy of a full carton. .....
7 Years
Mar 9, 2014
20,622
15,042
821
Oregon
My Coop
My Coop
There are many claims about DE - most of which are unable to be held up with any sort of scientific evidence, testing or proof of efficacy. While I don't disagree that it can be beneficial in external applications (as part of preventative measures for external parasites in a dust bath, for example) it does not effectively treat an existing infestation and is also not a good control agent for internal parasites.
 

saltandpepper2

Songster
6 Years
Dec 4, 2013
1,119
134
161
Somewhere over the hill
My Coop
My Coop
What do you known about the DE in poultry?

From personal experience, it has helped get rid on infestations of different pests when used in conjunction to deep cleaning the coop, and dusting the birds, it is extremely caustic, and if you breath it in, you'll be coughing for weeks, ( again, known from experience) chickens like to dust bathe in it. Not good if you have gardens nearby, as it kill insects. period. good or bad, DE will affect a population, including beneficial bees. Doesn't seem to help at all if you have an existing infestation of internal parasites, but seems to work well as a preventative when used in conjunctions with garlic, ACV, and pumkin... of course, it could just be that these other products work, but it can't hurt to add it too.

Not good to feed to animals in large doses, as it's harsh on the body's intestinal lining, and sensitive organs. ( got to remember, it is crushed up shells, it's SHARP)

this is all from my research, and personal exp when I had mites and termites in my coop.
 

eduardo domingu

In the Brooder
May 17, 2015
20
0
24
But, about the bees, DE is HARMLESS with bees, they have a genetic imprint that prevents approach the diatomaceous earth.That is why the beekeepers are very happy with DE an d use it to prevent varroa in hives.
The amorphous DE is no caustic, is basic ph, in the heartburn you can eat DE with water to correct the stomach pH.
Maybe you are using the cristalline silica, that one is HARMFUL and can cause respiratory problems.

I use it as bedding, it is drying, because of kill the nematodes eggs. It prevents the odor in henhouse and maintains the chikens dry.

There is a lot of calcium carbonate in DE, have you tried to prevent soft shells feeding the hens whith it??

Do you really thing that a 0,2 micron particle can be SHARP to damage the intestine?

Thanks a lot.
 

dawg53

Humble
Premium Feather Member
12 Years
Nov 27, 2008
27,733
14,058
906
Glen St Mary, Florida
But, about the bees, DE is HARMLESS with bees, they have a genetic imprint that prevents approach the diatomaceous earth.That is why the beekeepers are very happy with DE an d use it to prevent varroa in hives.
The amorphous DE is no caustic, is basic ph, in the heartburn you can eat DE with water to correct the stomach pH.
Maybe you are using the cristalline silica, that one is HARMFUL and can cause respiratory problems.

I use it as bedding, it is drying, because of kill the nematodes eggs. It prevents the odor in henhouse and maintains the chikens dry.

There is a lot of calcium carbonate in DE, have you tried to prevent soft shells feeding the hens whith it??

Do you really thing that a 0,2 micron particle can be SHARP to damage the intestine?

Thanks a lot.

DE is not used to treat mites in bees:
http://www.brushymountainbeefarm.com/Resources/MedSummary_test.asp
http://www.dave-cushman.net/bee/varroatreatment.html
http://www.biosecurity.govt.nz/pests-diseases/animals/varroa/paper/varroa-treatment-options.htm
http://www.bees-and-beekeeping.com/varroa-mite.html
Consuming DE will not treat heartburn. Like sand, it is not absorbed and it will quickly pass out your rear end. Inhale or breathe it enough and it will irritate your lungs, no matter what type of DE it is.
http://www.sciencelab.com/msds.php?msdsId=9923703
DE does NOT kill nematode eggs. DE cannot penetrate the hardened shell of nematode eggs, nematode eggs can survive in harsh environments for many years.
Tums (antacid) is calcium carbonate. That's what you use for heartburn, not DE.
As far as a 0.2 micron particle damaging the intestine; you might be right about that, since the DE would be wet and is excreted very quickly out of the body...poultry or human.
 

saltandpepper2

Songster
6 Years
Dec 4, 2013
1,119
134
161
Somewhere over the hill
My Coop
My Coop
But, about the bees, DE is HARMLESS with bees, they have a genetic imprint that prevents approach the diatomaceous earth.That is why the beekeepers are very happy with DE an d use it to prevent varroa in hives.
The amorphous DE is no caustic, is basic ph, in the heartburn you can eat DE with water to correct the stomach pH. 
Maybe you are using the cristalline silica, that one is HARMFUL and can cause respiratory problems. 

I use it as bedding, it is drying, because of kill the nematodes eggs. It prevents the odor in henhouse and maintains the chikens dry.

There is a lot of calcium carbonate in DE, have you tried to prevent soft shells feeding the hens whith it??

Do you really thing that a 0,2 micron particle can be SHARP to damage the intestine? 

Thanks a lot.
Just saying what I've read in my research! As for it not being bad for breathing, I have good quality, food grade DE, and if you breath it in, in my experience it's about as bad as hydrated lime for your lungs... As for being sharp enough, again, that's what I've read. I have no personal exp with eating it.
 

Akrnaf2

The educated Rhino
6 Years
Jul 5, 2014
16,826
15,048
732
Center of Israel
There are many claims about DE - most of which are unable to be held up with any sort of scientific evidence, testing or proof of efficacy.   While I don't disagree that it can be beneficial in external applications (as part of preventative measures for external parasites in a dust bath, for example) it does not effectively treat an existing infestation and is also not a good control agent for internal parasites.



Effect of diatomaceous earth on parasite load, egg production, and egg quality of free-range organic laying hens
D. C. Bennett 1, A. Yee 2, Y.-J. Rhee 3 and K. M. Cheng
+ Author Affiliations

Avian Research Centre, Faculty of Land and Food Systems, University of British Columbia, 2357 Main Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 1Z4 Canada
+ Author Notes

↵2 Present address: Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, S7N 5B4 Canada.

↵3 Present address: Livestock Research Center, National Agricultural Cooperative Federation, San54, Sindu-ri, Gongdo-eup, Anseong-si, Gyeonggi-do, 456-824 Korea.

↵1 Corresponding author: [email protected]
Received November 24, 2010.
Pleas read this article I realy want to read your opinion. You can search it in google scholar ,i cant bring a link so you can search it by the articl name.
 
Last edited:

eduardo domingu

In the Brooder
May 17, 2015
20
0
24
Here you have a security report about diatomaeous earth in a mine in the south of Spain, traduce, read and research about DE with scientific studies.
 

eduardo domingu

In the Brooder
May 17, 2015
20
0
24
No difference in BW was found between BB and LB hens. Interestingly, hens fed a DE-supplemented diet maintained their BW throughout the laying season whereas those on the control diet experienced a decrease in BW. This was found more in BB hens than in LB hens. In addition to having heavier BW, hens supplemented with DE consumed 8 ± 2 g/hen per day more and laid more and bigger, better quality eggs, with a 92% hen day production, compared with 81% for the control hens during the laying season. It is not uncommon for free-range hens to lose weight when they start laying eggs (J. P. Jacob, University of Kentucky; personal communication), especially in situations in which they were moved to a new area for the laying season. Increased soil intake (estimated to be 14–32 g/d for free-range hens; van der Meulen et al., 2008) could be a major source of nutrient diluent. van der Meulen et al. (2008) reported that hens increased their feed intake in response to increasing amount of sand in their diet. This compensation allowed them to maintain their egg production and egg weight but BW gain was still compromised. It is not clear how DE could help hens to maintain their BW and better egg production. Hens fed the DE-supplemented diet consumed more and the increased feed intake could be a significant factor. It may be possible that DE offers essential trace elements or may improve absorption of nutrients. Diatomaceous earth consists of 86 to 94% silica, with the remainder containing alumina, calcium, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, magnesium, iron, sulfur, and other trace elements (Korunic, 1998; Mclean et al., 2005). The use of absorbent clay supplements in the form of phyllosilicates, such as bentonite and kaolinite, has been shown to have some direct benefits in poultry by improving feed efficiency
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom