Diatomaceous earth question

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by emmak, May 20, 2010.

  1. emmak

    emmak Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 29, 2010
    North Central Texas
    How do you use DE? Do you sprinkle it on the ground of the run? Will it hurt the chickens if they eat it?
     
  2. mdbokc

    mdbokc Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 22, 2009
    Oklahoma County, OK
    I use it on the floor of the coop in the pine shavings and the nests. Yes, they can eat it as long as it is "Food Grade." It must be that and say that.
     
  3. bakerjw

    bakerjw Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 14, 2010
    Johnson City, Tn
    Make sure that it is food grade.

    Sprinkle it where they take dust baths as well as around the coop.

    Food grade is edible however I don't think that breathing it is a very good idea.
     
  4. emmak

    emmak Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 29, 2010
    North Central Texas
    OK, thanks for your feedback. The stuff I bought doesn't say food grade and has a warning about using it with animals. I guess I'm going to have to go to the organic gardening store to find food grade.[​IMG]
     
  5. coltbreath

    coltbreath Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 19, 2009
    I need to know how much to DE to mix in the feed I know its a great wormer. I do have food grade I have an 18" reel feeder would a table spoon over the feed do the trick. The approximat amount of feed is three cups for this feeder
    I have read it should be 2% of the feed mix for benefits. also any ideas for controlling sparrows and other pest birds ???[​IMG]
     
  6. mdbokc

    mdbokc Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 22, 2009
    Oklahoma County, OK
    A number of feed stores have "Food Grade" DE, especially if they cater to horses. Our horse people here literally load up the back of a pickup with it so it is readily available.
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2010
  7. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    Grifton NC
    I need to know how much to DE to mix in the feed I know its a great wormer.

    It's never been scientifically proven to have any effect on internal parasites
    It's only proven uses are as a "drying agent" and a mechanical insecticide​
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2010
  8. coltbreath

    coltbreath Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 19, 2009
    I thought I remembered a post which mentioned it as A great wormer I dont know for sure, but thanks for the feedback
     
  9. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    Grifton NC
    Quote:Lots of sites ( and people) SAY that. Most of the sites are SELLING it, and most of the people are REPEATING it

    The thing is NO scientific studies have ever shown it to have any effect on internal parasites
    In fact the ONLY reason it has a "Food Grade" rating at all is due to it's use in grains, both as a "drying agent" to make the grains flow better in handling, and as an insecticide.

    Since it can't be removed, it has to be SAFE to eat.
    Since its about 90% Silica (one of the most common minerals on Earth), its much the same as eating sand

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silicon_dioxide

    Silica is most commonly found in nature as sand or quartz, as well as in the cell walls of diatoms. Silica is the most abundant mineral in the Earth's crust.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diatomaceous_earth

    Diatomaceous earth (pronounced /ˌdaɪ.ətɵˌmeɪʃəs ˈɜrθ/) also known as diatomite or kieselgur, is a naturally occurring, soft, siliceous sedimentary rock that is easily crumbled into a fine white to off-white powder. It has a particle size ranging from less than 1 micron to more than 1 millimeter, but typically 10 to 200 microns.[1] This powder has an abrasive feel, similar to pumice powder, and is very light, due to its high porosity. The typical chemical composition of oven dried diatomaceous earth is 80 to 90% silica, with 2 to 4% alumina (attributed mostly to clay minerals) and 0.5 to 2% iron oxide.[1]​
     

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