Differentiating Bronze/Wild Breeds

Discussion in 'Turkeys' started by AVizcaya, Mar 12, 2011.

  1. AVizcaya

    AVizcaya Songster

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    May 8, 2009
    Ok, so recently there has been some discussion on the Wishard bronze turkey and now it has me curious, how exactly do you differentiate a Wishard from a Kordash from a wild mix????? I mean, the only reason I KNOW I have Wishard is because I happen to know Thundering Hooves who put be in contact with Mad Matchery, Bernie Nash, but if I wanted to add some new blood, how would I know what I am getting? I would love some input from anyone/everyone that has any experience with such things. Thank you, Alex.
     
  2. Soaring Chicks

    Soaring Chicks Soaring Hawks Farm

    Jan 3, 2010
    Henderson,NC
    I so hope someone that's knows what's what can answer this for you.
    I myself would really like to know too.
    [​IMG]
     
  3. Boggy Bottom Bantams

    Boggy Bottom Bantams Crowing

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    Hahira, GA
    I'm assuming those are just some fancy line of bronze right? Never heard of them.
    I do keep both rio grandes and merriam wilds though.
    The easiest way to tell them apart is the bone structure. Wilds are very slim and streamlined birds with fine bones, whereas ALL domestic turkeys reguardless of color or line are heavy thick bones bulky birds.
    Just pick one of each up and feel their legs and wings and you'll instantly see what I'm talking about.
    we were doing my NPIP test last year and as we were holding them, the tester said it just as we grabbed the first bird, he said, man something's different about these guys, they must be wilds.

    Color can be very hard in some cases, though I can look at one and tell right off, but it takes someone familiar with what they are looking at. That's why there are so many frauds on ebay selling 'wild" eggs for high prices when they are really nothing more than heritage bronze.

    So color really wont help much, slimmer build and 1/2 the bone thickness, actually a totally different bone structure alltogether is the easiest way to tell.
    legs will be much skinnier, and the toes and feet much finer. Compared to wilds, domestics are built like tanks.
    Also the wattles on domestics are much heavier and looser on them than wilds, beards are often much shorter and curled too on domestics. Domestic spurs will be often much rounder, shorter and blunt compared to a 1- 1 1/2 inch stabbing tool on wilds legs.
    Leg color is often much brighter in wilds too .

    Hope that helps
     
  4. AVizcaya

    AVizcaya Songster

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    Thank you boggy bottoms, that has help me immensely on telling the difference between the wilds and domestics. I never intend on getting involved with wild strains because I am raising my birds and a sustainable meat crop and want them as big and healthy as possible. That brings me to the point of the Wishard Bronze, a larger bird than the Kardosh, breed in Oregon in a manner that would specifically harden them to the threats of the northwest. Being in Washington I found this to be a wonderful match. As to whether any of this is even noticeable, who knows? That is why I am here asking this question.
     
  5. Frosty

    Frosty Songster

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    Mar 30, 2008
    ND
    I could be wrong, but Kardosh and Wishard Bronze are probably Standard bronze that have been developed by the respective breeders. They spent years doing selective breeding for what they wanted (like there are several lines of other birds such as Holderread waterfowl that are know for their quality).
     
  6. pampered_poultry

    pampered_poultry Songster

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    Feb 16, 2011
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    Quote:To add to what Aubrey mentioned....my Merriams will easily take flight and can fly fairly high and long distances... something you don't get with domestic birds because of their bone structure.
     
  7. Boggy Bottom Bantams

    Boggy Bottom Bantams Crowing

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    no problem and glad to help

    yes Richard, forgot to add that, while domestic heritage breeds can fly, it's more just to get on the roost and much more labored and shorter, the wilds can fly like the wind.

    yes, due to that different skeletal structure and leaner body design
     

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