Dilemma, looking for ideas, help?!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by karrm01, Aug 28, 2016.

  1. karrm01

    karrm01 Out Of The Brooder

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    May 7, 2013
    Hi, 3 weekends ago, I came home from a trip and my 4 1/2 yr old orpington hen was bleeding at her comb. I immediately suspected my 1 yr old scilian buttercup attacked her. I also witnessed the buttercup attacking my 1 yr old easter egger but not as viciously. I separated the orpington. I tried separating the buttercup from the egger too but she's a sneaky devil. I've since taken the orpington to the vet due to inspection showing an infection on her comb and the start of bumblefoot. I've been treating her with meds and dressings. I also inspected the 1 year olds and took the egger to the vet because of bumblefoot. The vet didn't want to do anything (2 wks ago) and the egger's bumblefoot has increased in size. The egger is now also attacking the orpington when she feels like it and has a chance. The vet said it's because the orpington is the weakest link. I've tried building a second coop for the orpington (and failed) feeling that I won't be able to keep the buttercup out of the original coop no matter what I do since she's so persistent and sneaky. I also have the matter of making sure the one year olds still have access to their laying box as I divide their area -- the orpington doesn't lay anymore. Trying to medically care for one bird is hard enough and she's the gentle one -- the orpington. I feel I'm at my wits end between chicken behaviors, unable to manage them, unable to provide new appropriate housing for my orpington . . . I'm ready to find a new home for all. I just don't think it'd be appropriate to give anyone the orpington because she's not a normal chicken -- my friend says she has cerebral palsy -- and I feel she'll be really lonely if she doesn't have other chickens around. Any thoughts? Thank you!
     
  2. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    I'm sorry you are having trouble.

    Can you post some photos of the orpington, the feet of your suspected bumblefoot, your coop setup/run (housing) - how you divided it, etc.?
    You mention the orpington is not normal and has cerebral palsy - can you explain the signs/symptoms you are see?

    Sometimes other hens will attack one that is sick, so your orpington may be ill.

    You can try a separation pen for the orpington. @centrarchid shows a simple one to make on POST#6 https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1130409/help-rooster-isnt-getting-along-with-my-chickens

    Chicken behavior is sometimes confusing. So by posting some photos and giving us a bit more info we may be able to help you find a way to make your life a little easier.
     
  3. karrm01

    karrm01 Out Of The Brooder

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    May 7, 2013
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  4. jamesglasman72

    jamesglasman72 Out Of The Brooder

    I use something called peepers on my chickens when they start to pick on each other. A peeper is a little piece of plastic that covers there vision so they cannot see in front of them but can see to the sides and down this way chickens can't take runs at each other as easily.
     
  5. karrm01

    karrm01 Out Of The Brooder

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    May 7, 2013
    Ok, I added pix. They have a large area to run around. Before my two 1year olds, I only needed one layer of rabbit fencing. It's now 7 feet high. As you can see it goes under/around the orange tree and takes up 1/4 to 1/3 of my back yard.. The first pic shows the llaying box to the left. Food under--though I just moved the treddle feeder for more open space. I got a bigger one when this whole mess started but they're scared to use it. Several water stations. The Orpington has all her own now in her separate area. But she seems scared to use the old treddle feeder not that she ever liked it. The coop I tried to build the Orpington turned out too small. The 2 pics of feet are of the egger. The orpington's is still heeling from vet surgery. The last pic is of orpington's comb. Looking better now after a week of meds. I padded the egger's roost and took away their day perch since it was over 18 inches high. I thought to put down play sand but the vet warned of impacted crop. I have a watering system that sprays almost everything 3x per wk so don't want mold if I put hay or pine shavings down.
     
  6. karrm01

    karrm01 Out Of The Brooder

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    May 7, 2013
    Your chickens actually keep them on? Where do you get them?

    I tried wrapping one of my egger's feet just to see what she'd do and unlike my Orpington, she ripped the thing off within a couple hours.
     
  7. karrm01

    karrm01 Out Of The Brooder

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    May 7, 2013
    Hi, I was getting excited about those peepers and then looking at that buttercup this morning, I don't think it would work. She's got a huge floppy buttercup comb that falls over her L side and sticks out forward of her nostrils. If the peepers are suppose to go in the nostrils . . . . I'll check with our local feed store and see if I can purchase one anyone but I don't have high hopes.
     
  8. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Sep 20, 2015
    Southern N.C. Mountains
    Possibly part of your aggression problem would be your feeders. If they are scared to use the treadle feeders, how are they getting food?
    Chickens are very food driven and if they feel there is not enough food this behavior will get worse. If they can't/won't learn to use the treadle feeders, then you may want to try a couple of hanging feeders to see if that helps.

    Separating the Orpington was a good idea. The comb looks like it may have some infection? Did the vet prescribe any course of treatment or medication?

    The EE foot does look like bumblefoot. So it will need to be taken care. The vet may be waiting for it to increase in size - wouldn't know why - but if you feel up to it, you can treat at home (links below).

    Sometimes chickens can seem a bit chaotic, but hopefully things will calm down soon. Observe your chickens and see when they are most aggressive to each other and why - it's most likely the feeders.

    Let us know how they are doing.

    http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2011/07/bumblefoot-causes-treatment-warning.html
    http://www.poultrydvm.com/featured-infographic/understanding-bumblefoot-care
     

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